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Hey, everyone. I'm writing a hexadecimal calculator in C++. The operations have to be done "by hand" because the requirement is for the program to be able to handle 40 digit operands (and 16^40 is much larger than a long long can handle).

I am having a bit of a problem, though. On my Mac (OS X 10.6) I can compile and run fine using both Xcode and g++ in the Terminal. I even had a friend on Windows using Dev C++ saying it runs fine. If I SSH to my school's Sun cluster, however, I g++ and the application runs, but it craps out after a few operations with:

"*** glibc detected *** ./a.out: free(): invalid pointer: 0xb786e6f4 ***".

I'm guessing the Sun cluster is what my professor used and thus why I lost points.

I'm not sure why this is occurring as I am not explicitly using memory allocation, and from all I've read on this error, it's usually (not always) the result of trying to delete something that wasn't made with the new operator. I'm wondering if it is thanks to the back-and-forth string/char conversions I am doing, but it still is puzzling to me that it runs fine for a few cases then dies.

Basically what this program does is ask for a filename, reads the file and interprets each string according to what needs to be done, and then does the math until end of file.

Here is my code: http://pastebin.com/1DW5pd6p

Here is the data file I was using (again note my program dies after the second operation): http://pastebin.com/xx59eQsu

I've already retrofitted some strings with char arrays and that seem to let me get those two operations in, but man am I confused. Thanks for the look, everyone. All responses are appreciated.

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uhm.. why you mentioned 16^40? –  fazo Apr 20 '11 at 19:23
1  
You may not be explicitly doing memory allocation, but you're using strings and stack-type operations, which do use memory allocation calls. –  Marc B Apr 20 '11 at 19:24
    
fazo - in case someone suggested converting between bases using sprinf :p –  Stefan Arambasich Apr 20 '11 at 19:38
    
Marc - I know that, but at the same time I'm not sure where I ran into trouble with that, but now I know. –  Stefan Arambasich Apr 20 '11 at 19:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted
string str;
char chr[1];
...
sprintf(chr, "%u", sum);

You're overflowing chr, this most likely affects str by overwriting some internal pointer variable used by std::string. When the string is destructed, it tries to delete this invalid pointer.

Make sure chr is large enough - e.g. char chr[32]; should be plenty for printing your integrals.

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Thank you, that fixed it! I just feel dumb now, though. Seems like just something I overlooked. Again, thank you! –  Stefan Arambasich Apr 20 '11 at 19:38

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