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One part of web development (from a front-end perspective) is laying out forms. There is never a standard set, and I've seen people continuing to use <tables> to keep styling consistent. Say you were to lay out this form:

enter image description here

At first glance it seems that a table would make laying out this form easy. Another options is to use <fieldset>'s, with perhaps a list inside them. Float the fieldsets to the left, give them equal widths.

My question is what is the most standard way of laying out forms? There seem to be several techniques, but many of them don't work cross browser.

How would you do it? And why?

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This should be moved to userexperience. –  DA. Apr 20 '11 at 20:03
    
How cross browser are we talking about? IE6 support? –  Richard JP Le Guen Apr 20 '11 at 20:12
1  
@DA This isn't a user experience question. A typical user does not experience a <table> layout any different from a floated CSS layout. It's an implementation question. –  Tim MB Apr 1 '13 at 22:36
    
@TimMB it might be. I can't tell if the question is "Should I use a table for this?" or its "what are general layout standards for forms?". The former is certainly implementation focused. The latter could go either way. –  DA. Apr 1 '13 at 23:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

I must say, the most common way to do this would be to use tables. Unfortunately, there are problems with table based form layouts (big surprise). One big thing is that tables will bleed over their containers (if overflow is not hidden) and they don't squash their contents like CSS can do. On top of that, rendering tables is more expensive (takes up more CPU cycles). Overall, I think that, compared to pure CSS solutions, table based form layouts are rigid and inflexible, and as a designer, I cringe (and you should, too!) at using tables for layout purposes to begin with.

A method that I am beginning to like (and that is growing more popular) is a pure, CSS2 method for laying out forms. I will not credit myself for coming up with the idea, but it is really straight forward. All you have to do is this:

THE HTML:

<form action="process.php" method="post">
    <label for="username">Username:</label>
    <input type="text" name="username" id="username" />
    <br />
    <label for="password">Password:</label>
    <input type="password" name="password" id="password" />
</form>

THE CSS:

label, input {
    width:200px;
    display:block;
    float:left;        
    margin-bottom:10px;
}
label {
    width:125px;
    text-align:right;
    padding-right:10px;
    margin-top:2px;
}
br {
    clear:left;
}

As you can see, the CSS code is really minimal and the results are really awesome. The pros of this method is that it uses less code (faster to download), it is cleaner without all the messy table tags littering your HTML document (maintainability), and I believe web browsers will render the CSS method faster.

Update 1: I also found a CSS method using unordered lists.

Update 2: @musicinmyhead reminded me about using fieldset and legend tags in CSS form layouts. I coded us a quick and dirty little demo here.

Note: I originally learned of this pure CSS form layout from: http://www.cssdrive.com/index.php/examples/exampleitem/tableless_forms/

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Thanks. This is basically the approach I think I'm going to go with, as tables are inflexible like you mentioned. –  dmackerman Apr 20 '11 at 20:13
1  
I agree this is one of the best solutions you can use, the only thing I would add to improve it is the use of the <fieldset> tag to wrap around the entire set of fields and a <legend> tag, you can utilize those as well as some additional CSS to achieve the look in the original question (where the input fields are wrapped in a nice box with title). –  musicinmyhead Apr 20 '11 at 20:17
1  
@musicinmyhead Thanks for reminding me about that... Totally forgot to put that in my answer! You got me thinking, so I coded up a quick little demo with fieldsets and legends in it: jsfiddle.net/techappetite/Xj2Lg –  Titus Apr 20 '11 at 20:27
1  
@Julius: Ok, I admit that when taken out of context like that, my statement does sound a bit too absolute. You're right, tables can do a lot of things, and CSS can do magic to tables. But overall, I mean that table-based form layouts are comparatively less flexible than pure CSS based solutions. I have edited my answer to more accurately express what I meant. –  Titus Apr 20 '11 at 20:40
1  
I just have to point out that according to the HTML 4 spec, form field elements cannot be direct descendants of a form: <form><label>Foo:<input></form>, instead you have to do something like: <form><fieldset><label>Foo:<input></form> or <form><p><label>Foo:<input></form>. But the HTML 5 spec allows it. –  Baker Kawesa Jul 5 '12 at 17:46

The practice of using tables as layout made sense prior to CSS, but tables are actually intended to present data and nothing else. The simplest way to layout a form is label above field in a single column, but it is possible to create the same grid-like layout that tables provide using the <div> element and some CSS.

For that, the CSS might look like this:

.layout-grid{
    display: table;
}

.layout-row{
    display: table-row;
}

.layout-cell{
    display: table-cell;
}

and the HTML might look like this:

<form action="foo.php" method="post">
    <div class="layout-grid">
        <div class="layout-row">
            <div class="layout-cell">
                <label for="foo">Foo:</label>
            </div>
            <div class="layout-cell">
                <input id="foo" name="foo" />
            </div>
        </div>
        <div class="layout-row">
            <div class="layout-cell">
                <label for="foo">Foo:</label>
            </div>
            <div class="layout-cell">
                <input id="foo" name="foo" />
            </div>
        </div>
        <div class="layout-row">
            <div class="layout-cell">
            </div>
            <div class="layout-cell">
                <button type="submit">Go!</button>
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>
</form>
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Research shows that labels above fields and fields all in one column are the easiest to fill out. Lukew has a lot of form's data/research/info:

http://www.lukew.com/ff/entry.asp?504

As a bonus, that's usually the easiest way to build the presentation layer as well. Plus, it's usually much more mobile-friendly out-of-the-box.

All that said, tables can be valid. In many ways, a form is a partially filled out spreadsheet (if you want to think in terms of tabular data).

I typically wrap the LABEL/FIELD pair in a div and position the label and field as needed depending on the layout desired.

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Personally? A table. At work? CSS. I go with whatever is required. There's the whole debate about the fact that a form is not in and of itself tabular data (like that of a form), which is true, and there is CSS that can create a cell-like structure.

If you're short on time and comfortable with only tables? Tables. Next up is the CSS/cell structure, but most will (probably rightly) say CSS all the way. It's not too difficult, and if you want to mix and match the whole thing, say adding an extra, fourth question at the bottom at the first three, it will make the change just a tad quicker. Not much, but a tad.

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