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I am trying to use this to figure out if a color is light or dark

Evaluate whether a HEX value is dark or light

Now. It takes in a int

 float calcLuminance(int rgb)
 {
      int r = (rgb & 0xff0000) >> 16;
      int g = (rgb & 0xff00) >> 8;
      int b = (rgb & 0xff);

      return (r*0.299f + g*0.587f + b*0.114f) / 256;
 }

I have a hex color though.

I tried to do this

  var color = System.Drawing.ColorTranslator.FromHtml("#FFFFFF");
  int rgb = color.R + color.G + color.B;
   var a = calcLuminance(rgb);

I got 0.11725 I thought it would have to be in the range of 0-256 or something like that.

What am I doing wrong? Do I have to covert R to an int? Or am I just way off?

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6 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I am trying to use this to figure out if a color is light or dark

Just use Color.GetBrightness()


[Edit]

I want to determine if I should use white or black for my text. So anything ≤ .5 I should use white and > .5 black?

There are a number of ways to determine what color to use on a given background, none of which are perfect.

That last link actually recommends using black/white only, but choosing a cutoff point of 0.73 instead of 0.5. I think you should just go with that, and change it if you find it doesn't work for you.

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+1 for skipping the whole problem ;) –  Lasse Espeholt Apr 20 '11 at 20:11
    
@BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft- so something like this System.Drawing.Color someColor = System.Drawing.Color.FromArgb(color.R, color.G, color.B); float ab = someColor.GetBrightness(); Is there anyway to do this without converting it first to rgb? –  chobo2 Apr 20 '11 at 20:12
1  
@chobo2 Just float ab = System.Drawing.ColorTranslator.FromHtml("#FFFFFF").GetBrightness(); :) –  Lasse Espeholt Apr 20 '11 at 20:14
    
@Chobo: Well, how are you inputting the color into the computer? The example you gave is RGB: in "#FFFFFF", the first "FF" is the R (in hexadecimal), the second "FF" is the G, and the third "FF" is the B. As @lasseespeholt states in the comment above, you can get the brightness from your RGB-string in one line. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Apr 20 '11 at 20:15
    
@lasseespeholt - Cool. So I want to determine if I should use white or black for my text. So anything that is .5 and less should I use white and if greater than .5 I should use black? –  chobo2 Apr 20 '11 at 20:17
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Just convert the hex string to an integer:

int color = Convert.ToInt32("FFFFFF", 16);
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+1 for simplest solution... –  Lasse Espeholt Apr 20 '11 at 20:07
    
Whoops, I upvoted this because I misread the question. He is not actually asking "How to convert from hex to RGB" - what he really wants to know is how to get the brightness (luminance) of an RGB color. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Apr 20 '11 at 20:09
    
He's got two different potential questions. "How to do x" and "Is there a better way than x". I answered the first one and you answered the second! –  Chris Haas Apr 20 '11 at 20:12
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A little of topic, but here is an extension method to the Color struct I've created to calculate Luminance with different algorithms. Hope it helps you.

public static class ColorExtensions
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the luminance of the color. A value between 0 (black) and 1 (white)
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="color">The color.</param>
    /// <param name="algorithm">The type of luminance alg to use.</param>
    /// <returns>A value between 0 (black) and 1 (white)</returns>
    public static double GetLuminance(this Color color, LuminanceAlgorithm algorithm = LuminanceAlgorithm.Photometric)
    {
        switch (algorithm)
        {
            case LuminanceAlgorithm.CCIR601:
                return (0.2126 * color.R + 0.7152 * color.G + 0.0722 * color.B) / 255;

            case LuminanceAlgorithm.Perceived:
                return (Math.Sqrt(0.241 * Math.Pow(color.R, 2) + 0.691 * Math.Pow(color.G, 2) + 0.068 * Math.Pow(color.B, 2)) / 255);

            case LuminanceAlgorithm.Photometric:
                return (0.299 * color.R + 0.587 * color.G + 0.114 * color.B) / 255;
        }

    }

   /// <summary>
   /// The luminances
   /// </summary>
   public enum LuminanceAlgorithm
   {
       /// <summary>
       /// Photometric/digital ITU-R
       /// </summary>
       Photometric,

       /// <summary>
       /// Digital CCIR601 (gives more weight to the R and B components, as preciev by the human eye)
       /// </summary>
       CCIR601,

       /// <summary>
       /// A perceived luminance
       /// </summary>
       Perceived
   }
}
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The problem, as I see it, is your calculation of rgb. You add the values together which gives you a number between 0 and 3*255 which clearly isn't the value your method expect. You will have to calculate it like this

int rgb = (int)color.R << 16 + (int)color.G << 8 + color.B;

which should be equivalent to this (except for the alpha-value you don't use)

int rgb = color.ToArgb();

Lastly, as you can see in Chris Haas answer, you can skip this step by converting directly to an int.

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calcLuminance only returns a percentage.

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The ranges of the R, G and B from the Color struct are 0-255.

To get the rgb value you expect in your function, you will need to left shift accordingly:

int rgb = (int)color.R << 16 + (int)color.G << 8 + color.B;
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