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I need help with the following statement to be converted to lambda statement how do i do it?

for (int row = 0; row < rows; row++)
{
    for (int column = 0; column < columns; column++)
    {
        gList.Add(new G(this, new L(row, column), 0, 20, 30));
    }
}

thanks for all the help!!!

share|improve this question
    
I do hope G and L are substitutes for the real class-names? – Henk Holterman Apr 20 '11 at 20:53
    
true they are :) – peplamb Apr 20 '11 at 20:58
1  
Based on what it looks like you want, you may want to edit the title/tags to include "LINQ" as opposed to "lambda". – nlawalker Apr 20 '11 at 21:01
up vote 2 down vote accepted
List<G> gList = Enumerable.Range(0, rows)
    .SelectMany(row => Enumerable.Range(0, columns)
        .Select(col => new G(this, new L(row, col), 0, 20, 30)))
    .ToList();
share|improve this answer
2  
Downvoted becaaaaaause...? – Dan J Apr 20 '11 at 20:52
    
I should make myself more familiar with SelectMany! :-) – Achim Apr 20 '11 at 20:54
    
me too, new to all this :) – peplamb Apr 20 '11 at 20:58
1  
It is a correct answer to the Q. But in this particular situation I don't find LINQ much of an improvement (readability) over for(;;). – Henk Holterman Apr 20 '11 at 21:30
var gList = Enumerable.Range(0, rows)
    .SelectMany(row =>
        Enumerable.Range(0, columns)
            .Select(column => new G(this, new L(row, column), 0, 20, 30)
        )
    ).ToList() or .ToArray();

SelectMany will flatten the Enumerable returned from the Select into an IEnumerable.

share|improve this answer
    
It might be worth mentioning that this results in an IEnumerable<G> (I believe) on which you'd probably call ToList() and assign to gList... – Dan J Apr 20 '11 at 20:52
    
Also might be good to call gList.AddRange because the OP makes no indication that gList is an empty list. – Davy8 Apr 20 '11 at 20:57
    
@Davy8 that goes beyond the scope of the question - I'm not coding for them just answering the question. :P – Chad Moran Apr 20 '11 at 21:05
    
while the OP should be able to figure that out, it isn't 100% answering the question because it isn't functionally equivalent in all cases. I still +1 but thought it worth at least noting. – Davy8 Apr 20 '11 at 21:07
var gList = from row in Enumerable.Range(0, rows)
            from col in Enumerable.Range(0, columns)
            select new G(this, new L(row, col), 0, 20, 30)

My favourite for inline cartesians like this

share|improve this answer
    
Does this preserve the same order as the original? (not saying it doesn't, I'm honestly curious) – Davy8 Apr 20 '11 at 21:05
    
Definitely will – sehe Apr 20 '11 at 21:11

Give me the indexes, project each index to a new L, project each L to a new G and assign the resulting sequence of objects to a list named gList.

var indexes = from row in Enumerable.Range(0, rows)
              from column in Enumerable.Range(0, columns)
              select new { Row = row, Column = column };
var ls = indexes.Select(index => new L(index.Row, index.Column));
var gs = ls.Select(l => new G(this, l, 0, 20, 30)).ToList();
var gList = gs.ToList();

Note that if gList is an existing list that you want to add to you can replace the last line by

gList.AddRange(gs);

It reads exactly like what it is doing.

share|improve this answer

As you can see from the other answers, using lambdas don't always result in cleaner code. Unless you have a specific reason for using lambdas in this case, I would leave the for loops as is.

Readability should be your primary concern, but I imagine using a normal for loop might be slightly faster because you don't have the overhead of function calls, but the difference in most cases won't matter.

share|improve this answer
    
If this execution construct is central to the app, it might become a performance concern using the LINQ approaches. I do think it is less error prone in this syntax – sehe Apr 20 '11 at 21:03

Putting everything into one single expression would lead to terrible code. Why would you do that? Does the following help: (untested, out of my head)

public IEnumerable<L> GenerateLs(int rows, int columns)
{
    for (int row = 0; row < rows; row++)
    {
        for (int column = 0; column < columns; column++)
        {
            yield return new L(row, column);
        }
    }
}

gList.Add(l => GenerateLs(rows,columns).Select(new G(this,l,0,20,30)));
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for unexpected hybrid. It won't compile (misplaced l => ), but it does use a lambda. I think this one is arguably the best advice – sehe Apr 20 '11 at 21:05

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