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I have a stylesheet that contains 10 selector definitions. When I view my website in IE and Chrome (I'm not including FF because it renders exactly like the way it does in Chrome), nine of the ten selector definitions work consistently across all browsers.

The one that doesn't work is defined as such:

a.dp-choose-date 
{
    /* border: 1px solid red; */
    float: right;
    width: 25px;
    height: 25px;
    padding-top: 5px;
    padding-left: 16px;
    position: relative;                  /* This is only needed for IE */
    top: -25px;                          /* This is only needed for IE */
    margin: 0px;
    display: block;
    text-indent: -2000px;
    overflow: hidden;
    background: url(../images/calendar3.png) no-repeat; 
}

As you can see, there are only two values that are necessary for IE. So I did some research on conditional CSS. I have now taken my style sheet and create a duplicate with the two additional entries for IE.

At the top of my document, I now have the following:

<!--[if IE]>
<link href="Styles/custom.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
<![endif]-->

<![if !IE]>
<link href="Styles/Site.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
<![endif]>

which is working, but can't I do the conditional statement at the selector level?

I also tried this in the CSS document which also didn't work.

[if IE] a.dp-choose-date {
    /* definitions here */
}

Does anyone have any suggestions?

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I'm pretty sure IE if conditionals don't work in CSS. –  mc10 Apr 20 '11 at 21:06
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

One way to do this is:

<link href="Styles/Site.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
<!--[if IE]> <link href="Styles/custom.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" /> 

Notice than I do not have a conditional around the first style sheet.

Within the second style sheet just define the tag as:

a.dp-choose-date   {
    position: relative; /* This is only needed for IE */
    top: -25px;   /* This is only needed for IE */
}

Due to the way style sheets work, the browser will combine and apply both definitions.

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This is what I was looking for. Thank you. –  coson Apr 20 '11 at 23:00
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You can make things easier on yourself by adding classes to target IE, and a nice way to do this is to wrap your opening html tag in conditionals like so:

<!--[if lt IE 7]><html lang="en" class="ie6"><![endif]--> 
<!--[if IE 7]><html lang="en" class="ie7"><![endif]--> 
<!--[if IE 8]><html lang="en" class="ie8"><![endif]--> 
<!--[if !IE]><!--><html lang="en"><!--<![endif]--> 

This allows you to prefix your IE only selector with the version of IE you want to target:

a.dp-choose-date 
{
    /* border: 1px solid red; */
    float: right;
    width: 25px;
    height: 25px;
    padding-top: 5px;
    padding-left: 16px;
    margin: 0px;
    display: block;
    text-indent: -2000px;
    overflow: hidden;
    background: url(../images/calendar3.png) no-repeat; 
}

.ie6 a.dp-choose-date 
{
    position: relative;
    top: -25px;
}
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Using IE's if conditionals at the HTML level is probably the best way to fix kinks that IE (usually < 9) has. Conditional comments do not exist at the CSS level. You can also (if you wish) use CSS hacks, but that probably isn't the best solution, as later versions of IE may not necessarily allow those hacks, but may still have the same CSS issues.

By the way, your second if conditional should be written as the following for validation purposes:

<!--[if !IE]>-->
<link href="Styles/Site.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
<!--<![endif]-->
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The easiest way to implement this logic:

[if IE] a.dp-choose-date {
 /* definitions here */
}

is to use IE's conditional comments to write out unique body tags:

http://www.positioniseverything.net/articles/cc-plus.html

So you can end up with something like this:

<body class="ie7">

Then, in your CSS, when you need to over-ride one style, you can do this:

.myStyle {--style for good browsers--}
.ie7 .myStyle {over-ride for IE7}

The benefits of this:

  • only one CSS file needs to be loaded (saving server requests)
  • your CSS remains valid (no ugly CSS hacks)
  • your over-ride styles stay with your good styles, so much easier to maintain
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