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I'm trying to reduce the amount of html markup related to presentation in my front end code. In a form I'm currently working on, I want to have 2 column of form fields. One way that will definitely do what I want is this:

<html>
<head>
<style>
body {width:400px;}
.col {width:200px; height: 100px; float:left; display:block;}
label, input {display:block;}
</style>
</head>
<body>

<div class="col">
        <label>Field1:</label>
        <input>
</div>
<div class="col">
        <label>Field2:</label>
        <input>
</div>

</body>
</html>

I want to achieve the same results when rendered in browser WITHOUT the div tags in the mark up. So I did something like this:

<html>
<head>
<style>
body {width:400px;}
label,input {width:200px; height: 30px; float:left; display:block;}
</style>
</head>
<body>
        <label>Field1:</label>
        <label>Field2:</label>
        <input>
        <input>
</body>
</html>

This is close, but I want the <label> markup tag to appear before each <input> markup tag in the code like so:

<label>field1</label>
<input>
<label>field2</label>
<input>

But problem here is that I can't think of maintainable css code that will make the label appear on top of each input field. Is there a good way to make both the mark up and the rendered result appear the way I want to?

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11  
Honestly, is it really worth sacrificing so much markup? The fact that you can't think of maintainable CSS code to achieve this at this point, probably means you're going a bit too far... –  BoltClock Apr 20 '11 at 21:37
1  
Why not just use the div tags? DIV tags are meant for division of a page which is exactly what you are trying to do. –  John Hartsock Apr 20 '11 at 21:41
2  
It's because I'm the only developer working on all tiers of this web application. Depending on which tier I'm working on at a given time, I have that particular HAT on. So when writing UI just to test my ajax calls, I don't think "presentation". I think mark up, and just type label,input,label,input. A few days later when i start to work on design, I have to mass edit my html. I want to save time and skip the html revision step. –  John Apr 20 '11 at 21:43
    
If you're working on a form, why is there no form element in your code? –  thirtydot Apr 20 '11 at 21:44
    
@thirtydot - There is in my real code. I left it out in my question so youguys don't have to look at as many tags, and just focus on the css question. –  John Apr 20 '11 at 21:46
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2 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

One solution is to put the input inside the label..

<label>Field1:<input></label>
<label>Field2:<input></label>

then example CSS..

label {width:200px; height: 30px; display:inline-block;}
input {display: block;}

or

label,input {width:200px; height: 30px; display:inline-block;}
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Of course! So easy. –  Pekka 웃 Apr 20 '11 at 21:52
1  
Hmm....does this solution come at the expense of web semantics? –  John Apr 20 '11 at 21:54
1  
@John not IMHO, but I hear tell there big discussions out on there on the interwebs.. but clicking the label still focuses it's attached input, which is the most important function of a label, no? you could span the text too and this would mean you can have aligned inputs (using floats) in your forms instead of above below like this, have often seen this used for two column forms where the labels are on the left and inputs/textareas on the right.. –  clairesuzy Apr 20 '11 at 21:59
3  
Labels are even allowed to omit the for attribute if their related input is inside it, but are only allowed 1 input within it. There is absolutely nothing wrong with this semantically, or in any way. I wish everyone would do this for checkboxes and radios so I don't have to home in on that tiny square/circle. –  Wesley Murch Apr 20 '11 at 22:42
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Seem's hacky, but this works.

http://jsfiddle.net/pxfunc/VCaMe/1/

using class="col1" or class="col2"...

HTML:

<form>
    <label for="i1" class="col1">Label 1</label>
    <input id="i1" class="col1" type="text" value="Input 1" />
    <label for="i2" class="col2">Label 2</label>
    <input id="i2" class="col2" type="text" value="Input 2" />
</form>

CSS:

form {width:600px;background-color:#eee;overflow:hidden;}
.col1 {display:block;float:left;line-height:30px;width:301px;height:30px;background-color:#f00;border:0;}
.col2 {position:relative;top:-30px;display:block;float:right;line-height:30px;width:299px;height:30px;background-color:#ff0;border:0;}

That said I still agree with the first comment under the question, seems like over-thinking a solution that could use div's or some kind of <label> & <input> wrapper

share|improve this answer
    
You should wrap your <form> elements with <div> or <fieldset> elements. –  mc10 Apr 21 '11 at 5:14
    
a semantic way to build this form is with <div>'s or <fieldset>'s but the question was about minimal HTML, so this is a solution for minimal html –  MikeM Apr 21 '11 at 12:56
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