Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I seem to be stuck behind the logic of a Solr faceting-powered tag cloud. First of all, I'm using OpenNLP to parse my docs and obtain relevant words out of it, so every single document gets split into n number of words. And here's basically what my Solr response looks like:

<docID>
<title>My Doc Title</title>
<content>My Doc Title</content>
<date_published>My Doc Title</date_published>
</docID>

I believe there must be a way to integrate the words in here. I first thought of something like this:

<docID>
<title>My Doc Title</title>
<content>My Doc Title</content>
<date_published>My Doc Title</date_published>
<words>word</words>
<words1>word1</words1>
<words2>word2</words2>
<words3>word3</words3>
<wordsN>wordN</wordsN>
</docID>

But the faceting wouldn't be possible, as i have no idea how many words fields i would get per docID, then the faceting would have to be done across fields (which i;m not even sure it;s possible). I am trying to look into possible answers but I seem to be stuck... at the end, i need to make a faceting of n words that would get each single doc I have in my index. Thoughts would highly be appreciated.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would suggest using a single words field that is multivalued and stores the list of words per document.

having unbound number of word\d+ fields will complicate things.

if you use a single words multivalued field you can get all the words along with their frequencies which should be enough for creating the tag cloud.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that, i hadn't look into the multivalued field option in Solr. As I've read, it is possible to facet a multivalued field properly... cranking up some code right now to test it. –  Osvaldo M. Apr 25 '11 at 15:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.