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Basically I have a Repository that controls access to my EF model. It creates the reference and then depending on the Repository being accessed, returns the Entity that was requested. Right now I am exposing an IQueryable Get method that will return the Entity directly off the live ObjectContext. Good practice tells me that I should wrap any ObjectContext use inside using statement to make sure it is properly disposed, but when I do this from the Repository I get an error that the ObjectContext has already been disposed by the time the controller loads it. I've removed the using and then it works just fine, but I'd like to know how one should normally approach this. I would like to maintain an IQueryable return as I may need to perform various commands on it. Any suggestions? Does EF help protect me from hitting open connections if multiple HTTP requests start coming in?

Errors out:

public IQueryable<IUser> Get
    {
        get
        {
            using (var context = new DrinkersPassportEntities(_connString))
            {
                return context.Users.AsQueryable();
            }
        }
    }

Works but doesn't help me sleep at night:

public IQueryable<IUser> Get
    {
        get
        {
            var context = new DrinkersPassportEntities(_connString);
            return context.Users.AsQueryable();
        }
    }

All my controller is doing at the moment is this:

    public ViewResult Index( )
    {

        return View(userRepo.Get);
    }
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Some people will tell you your repository shouldn't return Queryables....but I don't buy that.

You do indeed want to make sure you dispose of the ObjectContext or you can end up with a memory leak (especially since it holds on to all of the materialized entities).

A common solution is to use a per-request ObjectContext lifetime. That is, store the ObjectContext in the Request object of ASP .NET and handle the HttpApplication.EndRequest event, at which time you dispose the ObjectContext.

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I will look into the first line about IQueryable being returned from a Repository since I didn't know that. (this is my first go around with all of the things being implemented, ie. mvc, ef 4, Repository pattern, and dependency injection) As for a per-request ObjectContext, wouldn't that violate some of my seperation if the context is either being terminated and/or generated in the web app instead of in my repository? –  SenseiHitokiri Apr 21 '11 at 0:17
    
After a lot more reading based on your suggestion about the per-request ObjectContext I have found a good path to be on. While Chad's comment is technically correct as well, the web is aflame with reasons to avoid IQueryable. Suggestions online say I should abstract HttpContext to create a lazy-loading currentContext and then inject it. Seems like that is where I will be spending tomorrow. Haven't quite figured out where to dispose my ObjectContext yet, but at least it'll be available from the HttpContext. My guess is I can implement IDisposable somewhere. Thanks! –  SenseiHitokiri Apr 21 '11 at 6:16
    
It's aflame with reasons to avoid IQueryables and I respect some of them, but it's unmaintainable IMHO to have to write 500 repository methods like GetCustomerById, GetCustomerByFirstName, GetCustomerByFirstNameAndLastName, GetCustomerByFirstNameLastNameAndMiddleName. You end up with a repository riddled with duplicate and misused functionality. I'd rather expose an IQueryable. –  Jeff Apr 21 '11 at 14:20

Sure it's safe. A lot of people stub out and have 2-3 layers for data access to in the end just make sure your code is clean. How you get your objects is up to you and I think being pragmatic is the bets way to go about it. I think having a single Repository/Service class for a given type to help abstract out particular queries that are re-used is great but there's nothing long with exposing the context directly in the controller.

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