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I am going through some code and changing the database part of it to use PDO. Everything is working fine so far except for parameters in my prepared statement. For some reason, the below code isn't working at all. The two $_GET variables are basically used for sorting purposes on a specific page. The query itself works fine without using the parameters, and if I manually put "ORDER BY id DESC" at the end, that works fine too. I just can't seem to get it working with variable parameters. Here's the code:

$sort = $_GET['sort'];
$order = $_GET['order'];
$statement = $db->prepare('SELECT uid, id, fname, lname, ext, uname
  , email, access, created, modified, last_login, enabled 
  FROM users 
  ORDER BY :col :or');
$statement->bindParam(':col', $sort);
$statement->bindParam(':or', $order);
$statement->execute();
$num = $statement->rowCount();

Any suggestions?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
nice looking PDO code, isn't execute() only for sql statements with NO resultset? (update/insert/delete)? –  Johan Apr 21 '11 at 0:28
2  
@Johan PDOStatement::execute() is for any statement - php.net/manual/en/pdostatement.execute.php –  Phil Apr 21 '11 at 0:32
    
@Phil, OK thanks learned a new titbit. –  Johan Apr 21 '11 at 0:41
    
@Johan Thanks! :) –  Aaron Apr 21 '11 at 0:46
2  
Bound parameters can only be values, not expressions (= column names in this case). –  mario Apr 21 '11 at 0:51
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When passing parameters as the arguments to an ORDER BY clause, they are treated as literal expressions. If you want to order by a column or alias, you need to pass an identifier. In MySQL, these are represented by either an unquoted string, or preferably, a backtick quoted string, eg

ORDER BY `fname`

Similarly, the direction constant, when present must use either of the two keywords ASC or DESC. I'm not sure what happens if you attempt to use a parameter (which will be evaluated as an expression).


Here's how I've done it in the past using a map of allowed orderable columns...

$orderCols = array(
    'firstName' => 'fname',
    'lastName'  => 'lname'
);
$sort = isset($_GET['sort'], $orderCols[$_GET['sort']])
    ? $orderCols[$_GET['sort']
    : 'uid'; // some sane default

$order = isset($_GET['order']) && $_GET['order'] == 'DESC'
    ? 'DESC' : 'ASC';

$query = sprintf('SELECT uid, id, fname, lname, ext, uname, email, access, created, modified, last_login, enabled FROM users ORDER BY `%s` %s',
    $sort, $order);
$statement = $db->prepare($query);
share|improve this answer
    
Using parameters as pseudo-keywords will just plain not work! This is (part of) the reason why using parameters protects against SQL-injection attacks. –  Johan Apr 21 '11 at 0:43
    
Are you saying that I'm not using parameters in my statement correctly? PHP's documentation uses them in a WHERE clause so I would think mine should work fine (but it doesn't): php.net/manual/en/pdostatement.bindparam.php –  Aaron Apr 21 '11 at 0:51
    
+1 exactly what I wanted to say :) BTW, I think you can omit the directional keyword and it will assume ASC. –  alex Apr 21 '11 at 0:54
    
Thank you for elaborating more on this. I see what you did by using sprintf() and will give something like this a try tomorrow at work. –  Aaron Apr 21 '11 at 1:03
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Using parameters as pseudo-keywords will just plain not work!
This is (part of) the reason why using parameters protects against SQL-injection attacks.

Of course since you can manipulate the string you can just insert 'DESC'/'ASC' in there, reopening the whole SQL-injection hole.

So the :col will not be accepted as a field. And as regards the $order I would recommend code like

pseudo code (not real php)

if uppercase($order) <> 'DESC' then $order = 'ASC';
$query = 'select ... '+ $order;

The explicit test transforms any injection code back into 'ASC' making it safe to hack it like this.

Of course for the field you can also do an explicit test for all the possible field names. As long as you make sure the possible outcomes can only be valid field names you are good, but it's treading on thin ice.

Warning
Now that you are (potentially) back into manipulating query-strings you are also back into SQL-injection land, so be super careful with what you do.

share|improve this answer
    
I thought using prepared statements with PDO alone will take care of most SQL injection issues. Am I wrong on that? Do I need to also sanitize my parameters? –  Aaron Apr 21 '11 at 0:55
    
No, but you can only parameterize values, so if you want to manipulate the query by pasting in fieldnames or order directions (ASC/DESC) you are back into hacking SQL-query strings and thus back into SQL-injection land. –  Johan Apr 21 '11 at 0:57
    
I see what you mean, that certainly makes sense... –  Aaron Apr 21 '11 at 1:01
    
Forgot to say thanks for your help and for clarifying the SQL injection threat I now face. I hope I can now solve this tomorrow morning :) –  Aaron Apr 21 '11 at 1:13
    
@Aaron, you're very welcome. Good luck and keep up the good work. –  Johan Apr 21 '11 at 1:16
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