Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How to override a parent classes static variable.

So I have the parent class

class DatabaseItem
{
   static int instanceCount;

   DatabaseItem()
   {
     instanceCount++;
   }
};

if I have 2 classes that inherit from DatabaseItem, I want each class to record how many instances of their class only exist. How do I do this?

So:

class Person : public DatabaseItem
{
  // how do I make sure when I make the call  int numOfpeople = Person::instanceCount;
  // that I only get the number of people objects that exist & not all the DatabaseItem
  // objects that exist?
};

class FoodItem : public DatabaseItem
{
  // how do I make sure when I make the call  int numOffoodItems = FoodItem::instanceCount;
  // that I only get the number of FoodItem objects that exist & not all the DatabaseItem
  // objects that exist?
};

EDIT In response to comments

Yeah but, the above is just an example, if I do this then I have alot of repeating code...

So:

    class DatabaseItem
{
    public:
        static unsigned int instanceCount;
        static Vector <unsigned int> usedIDs;

        unsigned int ID;

        DatabaseItem()
        {
            ID = nextAvailableID();
            usedIDs.add( ID );
            DatabaseItem::instanceCount++;
        }

        DatabaseItem( unsigned int nID )
        {
            if ( isIDFree( nID ) )
            {
                ID = nID;
            }
            else ID = nextAvailableID();

            usedIDs.add( ID );
            DatabaseItem::instanceCount++;
        }

        bool isIDFree( unsigned int nID )
        {
            // This is pretty slow to check EVERY element

            for (int i=0; i<usedIDs.size(); i++)
            {
                if (usedIDs[i] == nID)
                {
                    return false;
                }
            }

            return true;
        }

        unsigned int nextAvailableID()
        {
            unsigned int nID = 0;

            while ( true )
            {
                if ( isIDFree( ID ) )
                {
                    return nID;
                }
                else nID++;
            }
        }
};


class Person    {
    public:
        static unsigned int instanceCount;
        static Vector <unsigned int> usedIDs;

        unsigned int ID;

        Person()
        {
            ID = nextAvailableID();
            usedIDs.add( ID );
            Person::instanceCount++;
        }

        Person( unsigned int nID )
        {
            if ( isIDFree( nID ) )
            {
                ID = nID;
            }
            else ID = nextAvailableID();

            usedIDs.add( ID );
            Person::instanceCount++;
        }

        bool isIDFree( unsigned int nID )
        {
            // This is pretty slow to check EVERY element

            for (int i=0; i<usedIDs.size(); i++)
            {
                if (usedIDs[i] == nID)
                {
                    return false;
                }
            }

            return true;
        }

        unsigned int nextAvailableID()
        {
            unsigned int nID = 0;

            while ( true )
            {
                if ( isIDFree( ID ) )
                {
                    return nID;
                }
                else nID++;
            }
        }
};

.. then I have to rewrite the same code for FoodItem, coffeeRun....

share|improve this question
    
Create a static for each derived class..no need to override. –  snoofkin Apr 21 '11 at 0:34
    
You don't override it, but you can hide it by creating a variable of the same name in a derived class. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 21 '11 at 0:38
    
@Tomalak Geret'kal What about if I make DatbaseItem's variables virtual? So virtual static unsigned int instanceCount; ? So the sub-classer HAS to create a variable of this? –  Mack Apr 21 '11 at 0:49
    
@Mack: Function members can be virtual, not data members. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 21 '11 at 0:52
    
@Tomalak Geret'kal Thanks for the reply. Is there any other option to solve my problem? –  Mack Apr 21 '11 at 0:54

3 Answers 3

I think it is not possible to have a static variable in the base class and tell from it how many derived class instances of each type are present. Instead, have a static class variable in each class that gets incremented in the constructor.

class Person : public DatabaseItem
{
     static int numPersonItems ;
     Person()
     {
         ++numPersonItems ;
     }
};

int DatabaseItem::numPersonItems = 0 ;

numPersonItems is the number of Person instances. Similarly can be done for the FoodItem class too.

share|improve this answer

Use templates to get away with all such problems of updating instance count in every constructor etc.

template<class T>
struct Instance
{
  static unsigned int count;
  Instance () { count ++; }
  Instance (const Instance& o) { count ++; }
};
template<class T>
unsigned int Instance<T>::count = 0;

Now this template can be inherited by any of the classes, which you need to get counted for their instances:

class DatabaseItem : public Instance<DatabaseItem> {};
class Person : public DatabaseItem, Instance<Person> {};
class FoodItem : public DatabaseItem, Instance<FoodItem> {};

That's it!

Whenever a class object is declared, it will do its job. It can be used as following:

DatabaseItem *pD = new DatabaseItem[5];
Person obj[10];
cout<<Instance<DatabaseItem>::count<<endl;  // 5 + 10 = 15
cout<<Instance<Person>::count<<endl;        // 10

You don't have to update count anywhere.

share|improve this answer

Given that you can't rely on virtual dispatch in a base class constructor, you need to either provide the static information directly to it as a parameter, or provide the derived class to it so it can query the static information itself. The latter is illustrated below

struct Base { 
    //provide whatever actual interface you need your type to have here
    virtual ~Base();
};

template<typename Derived>
struct Intermediate : Base {
    Intermediate() {
        Derived::var++;  //doesn't rely on polymorphism so ok in constructor
    }
};

struct Derived : Intermediate<Derived> {
    static int var;
};

Given your specific use case, I would be inclined to not do this at all, however, and either have the base class disperse unique IDs to all instances, regardless of type, or move the ID creation into a separate class/method outright, and query it for a unique identifier:

template<typename T>
struct UniqueID { 
    static some64bitIntType GetID(); //possibly non-static, lots of ways to handle this
};

struct Object {
    some64bitIntType ID;
    Object() : ID(UniqueID<Object>::GetID()) { }
};

Or something along those lines. Personally, I'd be inclined not to bother with releasing IDs back to be reused. Its a lot of extra work, with little practical gain unless you're trying to limit yourself to a relatively small number of instances.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.