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I am calling, through reflection, a method which may cause an exception. How can I pass the exception to my caller without the wrapper reflection puts around it? I am rethrowing the InnerException, but this destroys the stack trace. Example code:

    public void test1()
    {
        // Throw an exception for testing purposes
        throw new ArgumentException("test1");
    }

    void test2()
    {
        try
        {
            MethodInfo mi = typeof(Program).GetMethod("test1");
            mi.Invoke(this, null);
        }
        catch (TargetInvocationException tiex)
        {
            // Throw the new exception
            throw tiex.InnerException;
        }
    }
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There is another way to do this that doesn't require any voodoo. Take a look at the answer here: stackoverflow.com/questions/15668334/… –  Timothy Shields Mar 29 '13 at 21:41

8 Answers 8

up vote 76 down vote accepted

In .NET 4.5 there is now the ExceptionDispatchInfo class.

This lets you capture an exception and re-throw it without changing the stack-trace:

try
{
    task.Wait();
}
catch(AggregateException ex)
{
    ExceptionDispatchInfo.Capture(ex.InnerException).Throw();
}

This works on any exception, not just AggregateException.

It was introduced due to the await C# language feature, which unwraps the inner exceptions from AggregateException instances in order to make the asynchronous language features more like the synchronous language features.

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1  
that answer should be at the top –  stmax Aug 13 '13 at 7:25
    
And now it is. This is a much better solution. –  skolima Oct 23 '13 at 9:31
    
Good candidate for an Exception.Rethrow() extension method? –  nmarler Apr 7 at 15:48
    
Note that the ExceptionDispatchInfo class is in the System.Runtime.ExceptionServices namespace, and is not available prior to .NET 4.5. –  yoyo May 13 at 4:25
1  
You may need to put a regular throw; after the .Throw() line, because the compiler won't know that .Throw() always throws an exception. throw; will never be called as a result, but at least the compiler won't complain if your method requires a return object or is an async function. –  Todd Jul 9 at 23:19

It is possible to preserve the stack trace before rethrowing without reflection:

static void PreserveStackTrace (Exception e)
{
    var ctx = new StreamingContext  (StreamingContextStates.CrossAppDomain) ;
    var mgr = new ObjectManager     (null, ctx) ;
    var si  = new SerializationInfo (e.GetType (), new FormatterConverter ()) ;

    e.GetObjectData    (si, ctx)  ;
    mgr.RegisterObject (e, 1, si) ; // prepare for SetObjectData
    mgr.DoFixups       ()         ; // ObjectManager calls SetObjectData

    // voila, e is unmodified save for _remoteStackTraceString
}

This wastes a lot of cycles compared to calling InternalPreserveStackTrace via cached delegate, but has the advantage of relying only on public functionality. Here are a couple of common usage patterns for stack-trace preserving functions:

// usage (A): cross-thread invoke, messaging, custom task schedulers etc.
catch (Exception e)
{
    PreserveStackTrace (e) ;

    // store exception to be re-thrown later,
    // possibly in a different thread
    operationResult.Exception = e ;
}

// usage (B): after calling MethodInfo.Invoke() and the like
catch (TargetInvocationException tiex)
{
    PreserveStackTrace (tiex.InnerException) ;

    // unwrap TargetInvocationException, so that typed catch clauses 
    // in library/3rd-party code can work correctly;
    // new stack trace is appended to existing one
    throw tiex.InnerException ;
}
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1  
+1 now that it's fixed. –  Eric Feb 4 '10 at 15:10
2  
Actually, it's not much slower than invoking InternalPreserveStackTrace (about 6% slower with 10000 iterations). Accessing the fields directly by reflection is about 2.5% faster than invoking InternalPreserveStackTrace –  Thomas Levesque Jun 2 '10 at 8:58
1  
I would recommend using the e.Data dictionary with a string or a unique object key (static readonly object myExceptionDataKey = new object (), but don't do this if you have to serialize exceptions anywhere). Avoid modifying e.Message, because you might have code somewhere which parses e.Message. Parsing e.Message is evil, but there may be no other choice, e.g. if you have to use a 3rd-party library with poor exception practices. –  Anton Tykhyy Nov 17 '10 at 12:48
8  
DoFixups breaks for custom exceptions if they do not have the serialization ctor –  ruslander Feb 16 '12 at 19:06
3  
The suggested solution doesn't work if the exception doesn't have a serialization constructor. I suggest to use the solution proposed at stackoverflow.com/a/4557183/209727 that work well in any case. For .NET 4.5 consider to use ExceptionDispatchInfo class. –  Davide Icardi Jan 27 '13 at 23:40

I think your best bet would be to just put this in your catch block:

throw;

And then extract the innerexception later.

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10  
Or remove the try/catch altogether. –  Daniel Earwicker Dec 17 '08 at 22:41
1  
@Earwicker. Removing the try/catch is not a good solution in general as it ignores cases where cleanup code is required prior to propagating the exception up the call stack. –  Jordan Nov 2 '09 at 20:43
6  
@Jordan - Clean up code should be in a finally block not a catch block –  Paolo Jan 2 '10 at 18:12
5  
@Paolo - If it is supposed to be executed in every case, yes. If it is supposed to be executed only in failure case, no. –  chiccodoro Sep 1 '10 at 15:03
1  
Keep in mind that InternalPreserveStackTrace isnt thread safe, so if you have 2 threads in on of these exception states... may god have mercy on us all. –  Rob Feb 4 '11 at 1:35

Even more reflection...

catch (TargetInvocationException tiex)
{
    // Get the _remoteStackTraceString of the Exception class
    FieldInfo remoteStackTraceString = typeof(Exception)
        .GetField("_remoteStackTraceString",
            BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.NonPublic); // MS.Net

    if (remoteStackTraceString == null)
        remoteStackTraceString = typeof(Exception)
        .GetField("remote_stack_trace",
            BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.NonPublic); // Mono

    // Set the InnerException._remoteStackTraceString
    // to the current InnerException.StackTrace
    remoteStackTraceString.SetValue(tiex.InnerException,
        tiex.InnerException.StackTrace + Environment.NewLine);

    // Throw the new exception
    throw tiex.InnerException;
}

Keep in mind that this may break at any time, as private fields are not part of API. See further discussion on Mono bugzilla.

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20  
This is a really, really bad idea, as it depends on internal undocumented details about framework classes. –  Daniel Earwicker Dec 17 '08 at 22:39
1  
Turns out it's possible to preserve the stack trace without Reflection, see below. –  Anton Tykhyy Jan 19 '10 at 23:23
1  
Calling the internal InternalPreserveStackTrace method would be better, since it does the same thing and is less likely to change in the future... –  Thomas Levesque Jun 2 '10 at 8:54
1  
Actually, it would be worse, as InternalPreserveStackTrace does not exist on Mono. –  skolima Jun 7 '10 at 16:15
4  
@daniel - well its a really, really, really bad idea for throw; to reset the stacktrace when every .net developer is trained to believe it won't. its also a really, really, really bad thing if you can't find out the source of a NullReferenceException and lose a customer/order because you can't find it. for me that trumps 'undocumented details' and definitely mono. –  Simon_Weaver Nov 9 '10 at 5:28
public static class ExceptionHelper
{
    private static Action<Exception> _preserveInternalException;

    static ExceptionHelper()
    {
        MethodInfo preserveStackTrace = typeof( Exception ).GetMethod( "InternalPreserveStackTrace", BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.NonPublic );
        _preserveInternalException = (Action<Exception>)Delegate.CreateDelegate( typeof( Action<Exception> ), preserveStackTrace );            
    }

    public static void PreserveStackTrace( this Exception ex )
    {
        _preserveInternalException( ex );
    }
}

Call the extension method on your exception before you throw it, it will preserve the original stack trace.

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Be aware that in .Net 4.0, InternalPreserveStackTrace is now a no-op - look in Reflector and you'll see the method is completely empty! –  Samuel Jack Apr 19 '10 at 14:37
    
Scratch that: I was looking at the RC: in the beta, they've put the implementation back again! –  Samuel Jack Apr 19 '10 at 20:04
1  
suggestion: change PreserveStackTrace to return ex - then to throw an exception you can just say: throw ex.PreserveStackTrace(); –  Simon_Weaver Nov 9 '10 at 5:33

First: don't loose the TargetInvocationException - it's valuable information when you will want to debug things.
Second: Wrap the TIE as InnerException in your own exception type and put an OriginalException property that links to what you need (and keep the entire callstack intact).
Third: Let the TIE bubble out of your method.

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Guys, you are cool.. I'm gonna be a necromancer soon.

    public void test1()
    {
        // Throw an exception for testing purposes
        throw new ArgumentException("test1");
    }

    void test2()
    {
            MethodInfo mi = typeof(Program).GetMethod("test1");
            ((Action)Delegate.CreateDelegate(typeof(Action), mi))();

    }
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1  
Nice idea, but you don't always control the code which calls .Invoke(). –  Anton Tykhyy Jan 18 '10 at 10:46
1  
And you don't always know the types of the arguments/result at compile time either. –  romkyns Mar 3 '10 at 12:12

Anpother sample code which uses exception serialization/deserialization. It does not require the actual exception type to be serializable. Also it uses only public/protected methods.

    static void PreserveStackTrace(Exception e)
    {
        var ctx = new StreamingContext(StreamingContextStates.CrossAppDomain);
        var si = new SerializationInfo(typeof(Exception), new FormatterConverter());
        var ctor = typeof(Exception).GetConstructor(BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance, null, new Type[] { typeof(SerializationInfo), typeof(StreamingContext) }, null);

        e.GetObjectData(si, ctx);
        ctor.Invoke(e, new object[] { si, ctx });
    }
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