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I encountered this issue while working with the Java Collections API. Basically this is a support method for an implementation of Kruskal's algorithm for finding an MST. I created this class for implementing the union/find algorithm.

My question, as I was able to find a work around, is that does anybody know of any reason why the remove method in the "union" method would not work consistently. That is at run time it would remove some elements and not others. For example I implemented this for a task involving cities and it seemed to not like removing some cities. In particular it repeatedly stumbled on a couple of different sets, but always the same ones. I wondered whether it was a object reference issue, i.e. whether I was testing the wrong thing, but I could not get around it.

I know the rest of my work was correct as I was able to replace it with a loop that eliminated the element, and the algorithm executed perfectly. Probably with slightly worse performance, however.

I was wondering whether anybody can see a mistake. Also I should note that I called it from different class, however, the calls were made with elements that were retrieved using the find method. Note that the find method must work well, since simply altering the remove method made the whole thing work, i.e. it was finding and returning the appropriate objects.

Thanks

Oscar

/*
 * A constructor for creating a new object of this class.
 */
DisjointSets()
{
    underlying = new HashSet<HashSet<String>>();
}

/*
 * A method for adding a set to this DisjointSets object
 */
void add(HashSet<String> h)
{
    underlying.add(h);
}

/*
 * A method for finding an element in this DisjointSet object.
 */
HashSet<String> find(String s)
{
    // Check each set in the DisjointSets object
    for(HashSet<String> h: underlying)
    {
        if(h.contains(s))
        {
            return h;
        }
    }
    return null;
}

/*
 * A method for combining to subsets of the DisjointSets
 */
void union(HashSet<String> h1, HashSet<String> h2)
{
    System.out.print("CHECK ON DS\n");
    System.out.print("*********************\n");
    System.out.print("H1 is : { ");
    for (HashSet<String> n: underlying) 
    {
        System.out.print("Set is : { ");
        for (String h : n) 
        {
            System.out.print(h + " , ");
        }
        System.out.print("} \n ");
    }
    // Add the objects of h1 to h2
    // DOES NOT WORK CONSISTENTLY
            h1.addAll(h2);
    underlying.remove(h2);
}

}

And I replaced it with

HashSet<HashSet<String>> temp = new HashSet<HashSet<String>>();
        for(HashSet<String> f: underlying)
        {
            if(f != h2)
            {
                temp.add(f);
            }
        }
        underlying = temp;
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@lwburk Thanks for the formatting help, appreciated. –  oscarcollings Apr 21 '11 at 21:39
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem is that when you modify the contents of one of the nested HashSets, you screw up the internals of the outer HashSet (because the hashCode() of the nested HashSet has changed). in order to maintain this collection correctly, whenever you want to modify one of the nested HashSets you must first remove it from the outer HashSet and then re-add it (if necessary).

(you don't really provide enough code to figure out if that's truly the problem, but that's my best guess).

Set<Set<String>> outerSet = new HashSet<String>();
Set<String> innerSet = new HashSet<String>();

innerSet.add("foo");
outerSet.add(innerSet);

// *** BROKEN ***
innerSet.add("bar");       // <- adding element to innerSet changes result of innerSet.hashCode()
outerSet.remove(innerSet); // <- this may or may not work because outerSet is _broken_
// *** BROKEN ***

// *** CORRECT ***
outerSet.remove(innerSet);
innerSet.add("bar");
// now you can put innerSet back in outerSet if necessary
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So to be clear modifying the contents of an object of the HashSet class also modifies the hashCode() method of that class? I just want to clarify your answer, since you seem to say you must remove it from the outer HashSet. Do you mean underlying? Or do you mean the subset of underlying that contains the object? (intuitively I would think of that as inner in this context). I am just slightly confused by the order of removal that you specify. Would love to know more, and thanks for answering. –  oscarcollings Apr 21 '11 at 21:42
    
@oscarcollings - sorry, with all the sets floating around, it was hard to clarify which set i was talking about. i'll add some code examples. –  jtahlborn Apr 22 '11 at 11:01
    
Oh yes that makes sense. I now see that you must take the inner set out in order to preserve the integrity of the hash function. Thanks for your help, the example really helped clarify things. –  oscarcollings Apr 23 '11 at 2:38
    
sorry forgot to put your name in my response. –  oscarcollings Apr 23 '11 at 19:18
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Following up on @jtahlborn's answer, the contract for AbstractSet.hashCode() says

Returns the hash code value for this set. The hash code of a set is defined to be the sum of the hash codes of the elements in the set. This ensures that s1.equals(s2) implies that s1.hashCode()==s2.hashCode() for any two sets s1 and s2, as required by the general contract of Object.hashCode.

This implementation enumerates over the set, calling the hashCode method on each element in the collection, and adding up the results.

Code to demonstrate @jtahlborn's answer (which is correct)

import java.util.HashSet;
import java.util.Set;


public class TestHashSetHashCode {

  public static void main(String[] args)
  {
    Set<String> strings = new HashSet<String>();
    strings.add("one");
    strings.add("two");
    strings.add("three");
    strings.add("four");
    strings.add("five");
    Set<String> test = new HashSet<String>();
    System.out.println("Code "+test.hashCode());
    for (String s : strings) {
      test.add(s);
      System.out.println("Code "+test.hashCode());
    }
  }
}

Outputs

Code 0
Code 115276
Code 3258622
Code 3368804
Code 113708290
Code 116857384

One more reason to add to the list to make use of immutable collections wherever possible.

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