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My site has a MySQL database with about 50 tables. I work hard to make it as safe and secure as possible.

Per our development plan, we will be adding a forum in the not too distant future.

I'm unsure about whether it is better to have the forum in its own database, or to insert all its tables into our existing database. I've listed the pros and cons of both approaches below as I understand them, and would appreciate some advice from those more knowledgeable and experienced than I, which is nearly all of you :-)

Merged into Existing Database

Pros

  • integrating forum data into existing site is easier (example: using forum thread tags to match threads to site pages and automatically display links to relevant discussions)
  • can merge existing users table into forum so users need not re-register to begin using the forum
  • all-in-one backups

Cons

  • I've instantly added a huge amount of new code, some of which has database access, and all of which is a much higher profile target for shenanigans, meaning my original database is now placed at much more risk of attack
  • updating the forum software will be more hands-on, as it will not be a straight database flop

Separate Databases for Forum and Main Site

Pros

  • easy install, testing, upgrade, tear down of forum
  • forum database security holes don't place my main site at risk (and vice-versa)

Cons

  • integration into existing site requires querying two databases at once. I suspect this would be fairly more difficult to program.
  • users would have to re-register on the forum
  • backing up 2 databases rather than one (this is a minor con, but it is a con)

Your thoughts? :-)

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3 Answers 3

Merged into Existing Database Pros

  1. Integrating forum data into existing site is easier .. [nope. from a coding perspective there isn't any difference between running a query on one database versus another. Also, your queries themselves can cross databases.]

  2. can merge existing users table into forum so users need not re-register to begin using the forum. [nope. Yes you can do this, but you could do it even if the forum tables aren't in this database. So it's a wash]

  3. all-in-one backups. [I think you're grasping here. Whether one database or two, the backup procedures are the same. The only difference is you have 1 or 2 files]

Cons

  1. I've instantly added a huge amount of new code, some of which has database access, and all of which is a much higher profile target for shenanigans, meaning my original database is now placed at much more risk of attack. [maybe. IF the new code uses dynamic sql, and/or fails to use parameterized queries, then it's screwed regardless. Further, if your data layer allows the user the queries execute under full access to your server, which unfortunately seems to be par for the course on most applications, then it doesn't matter if the tables are in the same database or not. Interestingly the MySql site was cracked in this manner a month ago.]

  2. updating the forum software will be more hands-on, as it will not be a straight database flop. [? I'm not entirely sure what you mean by this. I've never heard the term "flop" used in this context.]

Separate Databases for Forum and Main Site Pros

  1. easy install, testing, upgrade, tear down of forum [No.. You have the same issues regardless of what database it lives in]

  2. forum database security holes don't place my main site at risk (and vice-versa). [depends on the types of holes and exactly how security was implemented]

Cons

  1. integration into existing site requires querying two databases at once. I suspect this would be fairly more difficult to program. [It's not. It has exactly the same level of complexity. Also your queries can cross databases.]

  2. users would have to re-register on the forum [Nope. You can reuse the same user table in the other table]

  3. backing up 2 databases rather than one (this is a minor con, but it is a con). [I would disagree, but then again we have dozens of databases on our servers and all of our backups are automated. Heck, as soon as we create one the maintenance plans automatically add it to the nightly backup schedule so it's not even a thought.]

Quite frankly, I'd say the only potential issue is in how the new forum stuff accesses the database and exactly what user rights that account needs in order to do its job. If done right then there is no issue; but if it's done way wrong then the only real protection would be to place the forum software on it's own database server... and even then it might cause problems.

But this should be identified by a proper security audit.

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"I think you're grasping here." <-- dude, I am grasping all the time :-) –  Andrew Heath Apr 21 '11 at 2:33
    
@Andrew Heath: hehe.. I think we all are. –  Chris Lively Apr 21 '11 at 2:38

Querying from 2 databases:

select db1.a.field1, db2.b.field2 from db1.a
inner join db2.b on (db1.a.id = db2.b.id);

Just make sure your connect string has access two both databases.
And both databases need to be on the same machine.

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The approach that has proven itself for me is:

  1. Install the forum as separate system
  2. write a thin layer to share login (if both use open id or something similar, be happy)
  3. As time goes I slowly and carefully merge the two system where it make sense, usually it does not. I love to share data between the two databases using views.
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