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I like instantiating my WCF service clients within a using block as it's pretty much the standard way to use resources that implement IDisposable:

using (var client = new SomeWCFServiceClient()) 
{
    //Do something with the client 
}

But, as noted in this MSDN article, wrapping a WCF client in a using block could mask any errors that result in the client being left in a faulted state (like a timeout or communication problem). Long story short, when Dispose() is called, the client's Close() method fires, but throws an error because it's in a faulted state. The original exception is then masked by the second exception. Not good.

The suggested workaround in the MSDN article is to completely avoid using a using block, and to instead instantiate your clients and use them something like this:

try
{
    ...
    client.Close();
}
catch (CommunicationException e)
{
    ...
    client.Abort();
}
catch (TimeoutException e)
{
    ...
    client.Abort();
}
catch (Exception e)
{
    ...
    client.Abort();
    throw;
}

Compared to the using block, I think that's ugly. And a lot of code to write each time you need a client.

Luckily, I found a few other workarounds, such as this one on IServiceOriented. You start with:

public delegate void UseServiceDelegate<T>(T proxy); 

public static class Service<T> 
{ 
    public static ChannelFactory<T> _channelFactory = new ChannelFactory<T>(""); 

    public static void Use(UseServiceDelegate<T> codeBlock) 
    { 
        IClientChannel proxy = (IClientChannel)_channelFactory.CreateChannel(); 
        bool success = false; 
        try 
        { 
            codeBlock((T)proxy); 
            proxy.Close(); success = true; 
        } 
        finally 
        { 
            if (!success) 
            { 
                proxy.Abort(); 
            } 
        } 
     } 
} 

Which then allows:

Service<IOrderService>.Use(orderService => 
{ 
    orderService.PlaceOrder(request); 
}); 

That's not bad, but I don't think it's as expressive and easily understandable as the using block.

The workaround I'm currently trying to use I first read about on blog.davidbarret.net. Basically you override the client's Dispose() method wherever you use it. Something like:

public partial class SomeWCFServiceClient : IDisposable
{
    void IDisposable.Dispose() 
    {
        if (this.State == CommunicationState.Faulted) 
        {
            this.Abort();
        } 
        else 
        {
            this.Close();
        }
    }
}

This appears to be able to allow the using block again without the danger of masking a faulted state exception.

So, are there any other gotchas I have to look out for using these workarounds? Has anybody come up with anything better?

share|improve this question
21  
The last one (which inspects this.State) is a race; it might not be faulted when you check the boolean, but might be faulted when you call Close(). –  Brian Feb 22 '09 at 0:04
1  
@Brian: Can I have more details on the Race? How can it happen? –  pdiddy Apr 9 '10 at 3:17
5  
You read state; it's not faulted. Before you call Close(), the channel faults. Close() throws. Game over. –  Brian Apr 9 '10 at 5:58
3  
Time passes. It may be a very short period of time, but technically, in the time period between checking the state of the channel and asking it to close, the channel's state may change. –  Eric King Apr 9 '10 at 16:22
3  
I'd use Action<T> instead of UseServiceDelegate<T>. minor. –  hIpPy Mar 23 '13 at 0:27

20 Answers 20

up vote 75 down vote accepted

Actually, although I blogged (see Luke's answer), I think this (see alternative link) is better than my IDisposable wrapper. Typical code:

Service<IOrderService>.Use(orderService=>
{
  orderService.PlaceOrder(request);
}

(edit per comments)

Since Use returns void, the easiest way to handle return values is via a captured variable:

int newOrderId = 0; // need a value for definite assignment
Service<IOrderService>.Use(orderService=>
  {
    newOrderId = orderService.PlaceOrder(request);
  });
Console.WriteLine(newOrderId); // should be updated
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Marc. I'll have to give this one a second look. –  Eric King Feb 25 '09 at 2:56
    
This is a good solution to the problem. –  RichardOD Sep 18 '09 at 10:15
3  
Missing a closing ); on the 4th/5th lines respectively? I can't edit yet... –  Rawling Oct 27 '10 at 14:51
1  
Can you explain why that is better than your code? –  Louis Rhys Jun 15 '11 at 6:32
1  
@MarcGravell Where could I inject that client? I assume that the ChannelFactory creates the client, and the factory object is newed inside the Service class, which means that the code should be refactored a bit to allow a custom factory. Is this correct, or am I missing something obvious here? –  Anttu Mar 21 '12 at 6:24

Given a choice between the solution advocated by IServiceOriented.com and the solution advocated by David Barret's blog, I prefer the simplicity offered by overriding the client's Dispose() method. This allows me to continue to use the using() statement as one would expect with a disposable object. However, as @Brian pointed out, this solution contains a race condition in that the State might not be faulted when it is checked but could be by the time Close() is called, in which case the CommunicationException still occurs.

So, to get around this, I've employed a solution that mixes the best of both worlds.

void IDisposable.Dispose()
{
    bool success = false;
    try {
        if (State != CommunicationState.Faulted) {
            Close();
            success = true;
        }
    } finally {
        if (!success) {
            Abort();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
isn't it risky to use the 'Try-Finally' (or the syntactical sugar - "using(){}") statement with unmanaged resources? Case in point, if the "Close" option fails, the exception is not caught, and finally may not run. Also, if there is an exception in the finally statement it can mask other exceptions. I think that is why Try-Catch is preferred. –  Zack Jannsen Oct 30 '13 at 13:54
    
Zack, not clear on your object; what am I missing? If the Close method throws an exception, the finally block will execute before the exception is thrown up. Right? –  Patrick Szalapski Jul 21 at 18:11
    
@jmoreno, I undid your edit. If you'll notice, there is no catch block at all in the method. The idea is that any exception that occurs (even in the finally) should be thrown, not silently caught. –  Matt Davis Sep 12 at 15:48

I wrote a higher order function to make it work right. We've used this in several projects and it seems to work great. This is how things should have been done from the start, without the "using" paradigm or so on.

You can make calls like this:

int a = 1; 
int b = 2; 
int sum = UseService((ICalculator calc) => calc.Add(a, b)); 
Console.WriteLine(sum);

This is pretty much just like you have in your example. In some projects, we write strongly typed helper methods, so we end up writing things like "Wcf.UseFooService(f=>f...)".

I find it quite elegant, all things considered. Is there a particular problem you encountered?

Edit: I should add, this allows other nifty features to be plugged in. For instance, on one site, the site authenticates to the service on behalf of the logged in user. (The site has no credentials by itself.) By writing our own "UseService" method helper, we can configure the channel factory the way we want, etc. We're also not bound to using the generated proxies -- any interface will do.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that's very interesting. –  Eric King Feb 23 '09 at 14:33
    
+1 for a very smart aproach, that is not lacking the possibility to return values from the service operation –  Marc Wittke Oct 29 '09 at 7:11
    
Site not available... link dead –  makerofthings7 May 25 '11 at 18:33
    
Yea, the server died and I haven't gotten around to restoring it somewhere else yet. –  MichaelGG Jun 1 '11 at 20:56

This is Microsoft's recommended way to handle WCF client calls:

For more detail see: Expected Exceptions

try
{
    ...
    double result = client.Add(value1, value2);
    ...
    client.Close();
}
catch (TimeoutException exception)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Got {0}", exception.GetType());
    client.Abort();
}
catch (CommunicationException exception)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Got {0}", exception.GetType());
    client.Abort();
}

Additional information So many people seem to be asking this question on WCF that Microsoft even created a dedicated sample to demonstrate how to handle exceptions:

c:\WF_WCF_Samples\WCF\Basic\Client\ExpectedExceptions\CS\client

Download the sample: C# or VB

Considering that there are so many issues involving the using statement, (heated?) Internal discussions and threads on this issue, I'm not going to waste my time trying to become a code cowboy and find a cleaner way. I'll just suck it up, and implement WCF clients this verbose (yet trusted) way for my server applications.

Optional Additional Failures to catch

Many exceptions derive from CommunicationException and I don't think most of those exceptions should be retried. I drudged through each exception on MSDN and found a short list of retry-able exceptions (in addition to TimeOutException above). Do let me know if I missed an exception that should be retried.

  // The following is typically thrown on the client when a channel is terminated due to the server closing the connection.
catch (ChannelTerminatedException cte)
{
secureSecretService.Abort();
// todo: Implement delay (backoff) and retry
}

// The following is thrown when a remote endpoint could not be found or reached.  The endpoint may not be found or 
// reachable because the remote endpoint is down, the remote endpoint is unreachable, or because the remote network is unreachable.
catch (EndpointNotFoundException enfe)
{
secureSecretService.Abort();
// todo: Implement delay (backoff) and retry
}

// The following exception that is thrown when a server is too busy to accept a message.
catch (ServerTooBusyException stbe)
{
secureSecretService.Abort();
// todo: Implement delay (backoff) and retry
}

Admittedly, this is a bit of mundane code to write. I currently prefer this answer, and don't see any "hacks" in that code that may cause issues down the road.

share|improve this answer
1  
if this were a discussion forum, it would be a good discussion, but it's not. –  John Saunders Feb 19 '11 at 4:48
    
Is the code from the sample still causing issues? I tried running the UsingUsing project (VS2013) but the line with "Hope this code wasn't important, because it might not happen." is still executed... –  janv8000 Jan 8 at 10:52

i've finally found some solid steps towards a clean solution to this problem.

This custom tool extends WCFProxyGenerator to provide an exception handling proxy. It generates an additional proxy called ExceptionHandlingProxy<T> which inherits ExceptionHandlingProxyBase<T> - the latter of which implements the meat of the proxy's functionality. The result is that you can choose to use the default proxy that inherits ClientBase<T> or ExceptionHandlingProxy<T> which encapsulates managing the lifetime of the channel factory and channel. ExceptionHandlingProxy respects your selections in the Add Service Reference dialog with respect to asynchronous methods and collection types.

Codeplex has a project called Exception Handling WCF Proxy Generator, it basically installs a new custom tool to visual studio 2008, then use this tool to generate the new service proxy (Add service reference), it has some nice functionality to deal with faulted channels, timeouts and safe disposal. There's an excellent video here called ExceptionHandlingProxyWrapper explaining exactly how this works.

You can safely use the Using statement again, and if the channel is faulted on any request (TimeoutException or CommunicationException), the Wrapper will re-initialize the faulted channel and retry the query, if that fails then it will call the Abort() command and dispose of the proxy and rethrow the Exception, if the service throws a FaultException code will stop executing and the proxy will be aborted safely throwing the correct exception as expected.

share|improve this answer
    
Very nice, thanks. I'll have to take a look at it. –  Eric King Jan 22 '10 at 13:32
    
Exception Handling WCF Proxy Generator not found –  Kiquenet Nov 12 '13 at 11:36

Based on answers by Marc Gravell, MichaelGG, and Matt Davis, our developers came up with the following:

public static class UsingServiceClient
{
    public static void Do<TClient>(TClient client, Action<TClient> execute)
        where TClient : class, ICommunicationObject
    {
        try
        {
            execute(client);
        }
        finally
        {
            client.DisposeSafely();
        }
    }

    public static void DisposeSafely(this ICommunicationObject client)
    {
        if (client == null)
        {
            return;
        }

        bool success = false;

        try
        {
            if (client.State != CommunicationState.Faulted)
            {
                client.Close();
                success = true;
            }
        }
        finally
        {
            if (!success)
            {
                client.Abort();
            }
        }
    }
}

Example of use:

string result = string.Empty;

UsingServiceClient.Do(
    new MyServiceClient(),
    client =>
    result = client.GetServiceResult(parameters));

It's as close to the "using" syntax as possible, you don't have to return a dummy value when calling a void method, and you can make multiple calls to the service (and return multiple values) without having to use tuples.

Also, you can use this with ClientBase<T> descendants instead of ChannelFactory if desired.

The extension method is exposed if a developer wants to manually dispose of a proxy/channel instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Is using this makes sense if I'm using PoolingDuplex and do not close connection after a call so my client service might live even few days and handle server callbacks. As far as I understand solution which is discussed here makes sense for one call per session ? –  sll Nov 13 '12 at 11:50
    
@sll - this is for closing the connection immediately after the call returns (one call per session). –  TrueWill Nov 13 '12 at 21:48
    
What's about omaralzabir.com/do-not-use-using-in-wcf-client ? –  Kiquenet Nov 12 '13 at 11:19

Just as a place to keep a reference. As the post Marc Gravell links to is no longer on the internet (here's a wayback version), I've taken the source from the question and enhanced it a bit to cache multiple channel factories and attempt to look up the endpoint in the config file by contract name. It uses .NET 4 (specifically: contravariance, LINQ, var):

/// <summary>
/// Delegate type of the service method to perform.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="proxy">The service proxy.</param>
/// <typeparam name="T">The type of service to use.</typeparam>
internal delegate void UseServiceDelegate<in T>(T proxy);

/// <summary>
/// Wraps using a WCF service.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">The type of service to use.</typeparam>
internal static class Service<T>
{
    /// <summary>
    /// A dictionary to hold looked-up endpoint names.
    /// </summary>
    private static readonly IDictionary<Type, string> cachedEndpointNames = new Dictionary<Type, string>();

    /// <summary>
    /// A dictionary to hold created channel factories.
    /// </summary>
    private static readonly IDictionary<string, ChannelFactory<T>> cachedFactories =
        new Dictionary<string, ChannelFactory<T>>();

    /// <summary>
    /// Uses the specified code block.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="codeBlock">The code block.</param>
    internal static void Use(UseServiceDelegate<T> codeBlock)
    {
        var factory = GetChannelFactory();
        var proxy = (IClientChannel)factory.CreateChannel();
        var success = false;

        try
        {
            using (proxy)
            {
                codeBlock((T)proxy);
            }

            success = true;
        }
        finally
        {
            if (!success)
            {
                proxy.Abort();
            }
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the channel factory.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>The channel factory.</returns>
    private static ChannelFactory<T> GetChannelFactory()
    {
        lock (cachedFactories)
        {
            var endpointName = GetEndpointName();

            if (cachedFactories.ContainsKey(endpointName))
            {
                return cachedFactories[endpointName];
            }

            var factory = new ChannelFactory<T>(endpointName);

            cachedFactories.Add(endpointName, factory);
            return factory;
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the name of the endpoint.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>The name of the endpoint.</returns>
    private static string GetEndpointName()
    {
        var type = typeof(T);
        var fullName = type.FullName;

        lock (cachedFactories)
        {
            if (cachedEndpointNames.ContainsKey(type))
            {
                return cachedEndpointNames[type];
            }

            var serviceModel = ConfigurationManager.OpenExeConfiguration(ConfigurationUserLevel.None).SectionGroups["system.serviceModel"] as ServiceModelSectionGroup;

            if ((serviceModel != null) && !string.IsNullOrEmpty(fullName))
            {
                foreach (var endpointName in serviceModel.Client.Endpoints.Cast<ChannelEndpointElement>().Where(endpoint => fullName.EndsWith(endpoint.Contract)).Select(endpoint => endpoint.Name))
                {
                    cachedEndpointNames.Add(type, endpointName);
                    return endpointName;
                }
            }
        }

        throw new InvalidOperationException("Could not find endpoint element for type '" + fullName + "' in the ServiceModel client configuration section. This might be because no configuration file was found for your application, or because no endpoint element matching this name could be found in the client element.");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
How much of a performance benefit does this offer? –  makerofthings7 Feb 21 '12 at 15:49
    
Why use UseServiceDelegate<T> instead of Action<T> ? –  Mike Mayer Mar 29 '13 at 23:01
    
The only reason I can think that the original author did so was to have a strongly-typed delegate the developer would know belongs to calling a service. But, as far as I can see, Action<T> works just as well. –  Jesse C. Slicer Mar 30 '13 at 14:37

What is this?

This is the CW version of the accepted answer but with (what I consider complete) Exception handling included.

The accepted answer references this website that is no longer around. To save you trouble, I am including the most relevant parts here. In addition, I modified it slightly to include exception retry handling to handle those pesky network timeouts.

Simple WCF Client Usage

Once you generate your client side proxy, this is all you need to implement it.

Service<IOrderService>.Use(orderService=>
{
  orderService.PlaceOrder(request);
});

ServiceDelegate.cs

Add this file to your solution. No changes are needed to this file, unless you want to alter the number of retries or what exceptions you want to handle.

public delegate void UseServiceDelegate<T>(T proxy);

public static class Service<T>
{
    public static ChannelFactory<T> _channelFactory = new ChannelFactory<T>(""); 

    public static void Use(UseServiceDelegate<T> codeBlock)
    {
        IClientChannel proxy = (IClientChannel)_channelFactory.CreateChannel();
        bool success = false;


       Exception mostRecentEx = null;
       int millsecondsToSleep = 1000;

       for(int i=0; i<5; i++)  // Attempt a maximum of 5 times 
       {
           try
           {
               codeBlock((T)proxy);
               proxy.Close();
               success = true; 
               break;
           }

           // The following is typically thrown on the client when a channel is terminated due to the server closing the connection.
           catch (ChannelTerminatedException cte)
           {
              mostRecentEx = cte;
               proxy.Abort();
               //  delay (backoff) and retry 
               Thread.Sleep(millsecondsToSleep  * (i + 1)); 
           }

           // The following is thrown when a remote endpoint could not be found or reached.  The endpoint may not be found or 
           // reachable because the remote endpoint is down, the remote endpoint is unreachable, or because the remote network is unreachable.
           catch (EndpointNotFoundException enfe)
           {
              mostRecentEx = enfe;
               proxy.Abort();
               //  delay (backoff) and retry 
               Thread.Sleep(millsecondsToSleep * (i + 1)); 
           }

           // The following exception that is thrown when a server is too busy to accept a message.
           catch (ServerTooBusyException stbe)
           {
              mostRecentEx = stbe;
               proxy.Abort();

               //  delay (backoff) and retry 
               Thread.Sleep(millsecondsToSleep * (i + 1)); 
           }
           catch (TimeoutException timeoutEx)
           {
               mostRecentEx = timeoutEx;
               proxy.Abort();

               //  delay (backoff) and retry 
               Thread.Sleep(millsecondsToSleep * (i + 1)); 
           } 
           catch (CommunicationException comException)
           {
               mostRecentEx = comException;
               proxy.Abort();

               //  delay (backoff) and retry 
               Thread.Sleep(millsecondsToSleep * (i + 1)); 
           }
           catch(Exception )
           {
                // rethrow any other exception not defined here
                // You may want to define a custom Exception class to pass information such as failure count, and failure type
                proxy.Abort();
                throw ;  
           }
       }
       if (success == false && mostRecentEx != null) 
       { 
           proxy.Abort();
           throw new Exception("WCF call failed after 5 retries.", mostRecentEx );
       }

    }
}

PS: I've made this post a community wiki. I won't collect "points" from this answer, but prefer you upvote it if you agree with the implementation, or edit it to make it better.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure I agree with your characterization of this answer. It's the CW version with your idea of exception handling added. –  John Saunders Mar 12 '12 at 19:12
    
@JohnSaunders - True (my concept of exception handling). Let me know of any exceptions I'm missing or am mis-handling. –  makerofthings7 Mar 12 '12 at 19:21
    
What's about success variable? It needs add to source code: if (success) return; ?? –  Kiquenet Nov 12 '13 at 12:49
    
Not retry for TimeoutException ? –  Kiquenet Nov 12 '13 at 12:57
    
If the first call throws and the 2nd succeed mostRecentEx won't be null so you are throwing an exception that failed 5 retries anyways. or am I missing something? I don't see where you clear the mostRecentEx if on a 2nd,3rd,4th or 5th try succeeded. Also don't see a return o succeed. I should be missing something here, but this code won't run always 5 times if no exception is thrown ? –  Bart Jan 28 at 16:05

Now I'm more than one year after the question was answered, but why wouldn't a wrapper like this work?:

public class ServiceClientWrapper<ServiceType> : IDisposable
{
    private ServiceType _channel;
    public ServiceType Channel
    {
        get { return _channel; }
    }

    private static ChannelFactory<ServiceType> _channelFactory;

    public ServiceClientWrapper()
    {
        if(_channelFactory == null)
             // Given that the endpoint name is the same as FullName of contract.
            _channelFactory = new ChannelFactory<ServiceType>(typeof(T).FullName);
        _channel = _channelFactory.CreateChannel();
        ((IChannel)_channel).Open();
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        try
        {
            ((IChannel)_channel).Close();
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            ((IChannel)_channel).Abort();
            // TODO: Insert logging
        }
    }
}

That should enable you to write code like:

ResponseType response = null;
using(var clientWrapper = new ServiceClientWrapper<IService>())
{
    var request = ...
    response = clientWrapper.Channel.MyServiceCall(request);
}
// user your response object.

Or am I missing something? The wrapper could of course catch more exceptions if that is required, but the principle remains the same.

share|improve this answer
    
I remember discussion regarding Dispose not being called under certain conditions... resulting in a memory leak w/WCF. –  makerofthings7 May 25 '11 at 18:31
    
I'm not sure it was resulting in memory leaks but the problem is this. When you call Dispose on a IChannel it could throw an exception if the channel is in a faulted state, this is a problem since Microsoft specify that Dispose should never throw. So what the code above does is handling the case when Close throws an exception. If Abort throws it might be something seriously wrong. I wrote a blog post about it last December: blog.tomasjansson.com/2010/12/disposible-wcf-client-wrapper –  Tomas Jansson May 26 '11 at 5:47

If you dont need IOC or are using autogenerated client (Service Reference), then you can simple use use an wrapper to manage the closing and let the GC takes the clientbase when it is in a safe state that will not thrown any exception. GC will call dispose in serviceclient, and this will call close, since it is alread closed, it cannot cause any damage. I am using this without problems in production code.

public class AutoCloseWcf : IDisposable
{

    private ICommunicationObject CommunicationObject;

    public AutoDisconnect(ICommunicationObject CommunicationObject)
    {
        this.CommunicationObject = CommunicationObject;
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (CommunicationObject == null)
            return;
        try {
            if (CommunicationObject.State != CommunicationState.Faulted) {
                CommunicationObject.Close();
            } else {
                CommunicationObject.Abort();
            }
        } catch (CommunicationException ce) {
            CommunicationObject.Abort();
        } catch (TimeoutException toe) {
            CommunicationObject.Abort();
        } catch (Exception e) {
            CommunicationObject.Abort();
            //perhaps log this
        } finally {
            CommunicationObject = null;
        }
    }

}

Then when you are acessing the server, you create the client and use using in the autodisconect.

var Ws = new ServiceClient("netTcpEndPointName");
using (new AutoCloseWcf(Ws)) {

    Ws.Open();

    Ws.Test();

}
share|improve this answer

I used Castle dynamic proxy to solve the Dispose() issue, and also implemented auto-refreshing the channel when it is in an unusable state. To use this you must create a new interface that inherits your service contract and IDisposable. The dynamic proxy implements this interface and wraps a WCF channel:

Func<object> createChannel = () =>
    ChannelFactory<IHelloWorldService>
        .CreateChannel(new NetTcpBinding(), new EndpointAddress(uri));
var factory = new WcfProxyFactory();
var proxy = factory.Create<IDisposableHelloWorldService>(createChannel);
proxy.HelloWorld();

I like this since you can inject WCF services without consumers needing to worry about any details of WCF. And there's no added cruft like the other solutions.

Have a look at the code, it's actually pretty simple: WCF Dynamic Proxy

share|improve this answer

@Marc Gravell

Wouldn't it be OK to use this:

public static TResult Using<T, TResult>(this T client, Func<T, TResult> work)
        where T : ICommunicationObject
{
    try
    {
        var result = work(client);

        client.Close();

        return result;
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        client.Abort();

        throw;
    }
}

Or, the same thing (Func<T, TResult>) in case of Service<IOrderService>.Use

These would make returning variables easier.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 @MarcGravell I think your answer 'could do better' too :P (and the action one can be implemented in terms of a Func with a null return). This whole page is a mess - I'd go formulate a unified one and comment on dups if I envisaged using WCF any time this decade... –  Ruben Bartelink May 15 '13 at 21:41

I have addressed this problem in an open source effort called SoftwareIsHardwork.ServiceModelClient library.
SoftwareIsHardwork.ServiceModelClient is a thread-safe, scalable, and functional replacement for the WCF clients ClientBase'1 and/or ChannelFactory'1. It beats the socks off any implementation I have seen on the internet; even those by so called WCF experts.
I will let you be the judge.

Please check out the Software Is Hardwork library

share|improve this answer
    
I get 404 error. what about softwareishardwork.codeplex ? any code source ? –  Kiquenet Nov 12 '13 at 11:33

I have written a simple base class that handles this. It's available as a NuGet package and it's quite easy to use.

//MemberServiceClient is the class generated by SvcUtil
public class MemberServiceManager : ServiceClientBase<MemberServiceClient>
{
    public User GetUser(int userId)
    {
        return PerformServiceOperation(client => client.GetUser(userId));
    }

    //you can also check if any error occured if you can't throw exceptions       
    public bool TryGetUser(int userId, out User user)
    {
        return TryPerformServiceOperation(c => c.GetUser(userId), out user);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Any updates for VS2013-.net 4.5.1 ? any options for Retry like stackoverflow.com/a/9370880/206730? –  Kiquenet Nov 12 '13 at 11:30
public static class Service<TChannel>
{
    public static ChannelFactory<TChannel> ChannelFactory = new ChannelFactory<TChannel>("*");

    public static TReturn Use<TReturn>(Func<TChannel,TReturn> codeBlock)
    {
        var proxy = (IClientChannel)ChannelFactory.CreateChannel();
        var success = false;
        try
        {
            var result = codeBlock((TChannel)proxy);
            proxy.Close();
            success = true;
            return result;
        }
        finally
        {
            if (!success)
            {
                proxy.Abort();
            }
        }
    }
}

So it allows to write return statements nicely:

return Service<IOrderService>.Use(orderService => 
{ 
    return orderService.PlaceOrder(request); 
}); 
share|improve this answer

Use an extension method:

public static class CommunicationObjectExtensions
{
    public static TResult MakeSafeServiceCall<TResult, TService>(this TService client, Func<TService, TResult> method) where TService : ICommunicationObject
    {
        TResult result;

        try
        {
            result = method(client);
        }
        finally
        {
            try
            {
                client.Close();
            }
            catch (CommunicationException)
            {
                client.Abort(); // Don't care about these exceptions. The call has completed anyway.
            }
            catch (TimeoutException)
            {
                client.Abort(); // Don't care about these exceptions. The call has completed anyway.
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
                client.Abort();
                throw;
            }
        }

        return result;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is the approach I've used for years. It's simple, terse, and expressive. –  RQDQ Jul 9 at 12:21

What do you guys think about this solution; Our system architecture often uses the Unity IoC framework to create instances of ClientBase so theres no sure way to enforce the other developers even use using{} blocks. In order to make it as fool-proof as possible, I had made this custom class that extends ClientBase, and handles closing down the channel on dispose, or on finalize in case someone doesn't explicitly dispose of the Unity created instance.

There is also stuff that needed to be done in the constructor to set up the channel for custom credentials and stuff, so thats in here too...

Thoughts / concerns / opinions?

public abstract class PFServer2ServerClientBase<TChannel> : ClientBase<TChannel>, IDisposable where TChannel : class
{
	private bool disposed = false;

	public PFServer2ServerClientBase()
	{
		// copy info from custom identity into credentials, and other channel setup...
	}

	~PFServer2ServerClientBase()
	{
		this.Dispose(false);
	}

	void IDisposable.Dispose()
	{
		this.Dispose(true);
		GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
	}

	public void Dispose(bool disposing)
	{
		if (!this.disposed)
		{
			try
			{
					if (this.State == CommunicationState.Opened)
						this.Close();
			}
			finally
			{
				if (this.State == CommunicationState.Faulted)
					this.Abort();
			}
			this.disposed = true;
		}
	}
}

Then a client can simply:

internal class TestClient : PFServer2ServerClientBase<ITest>, ITest
{
    public string TestMethod(int value)
    {
        return base.Channel.TestMethod(value);
    }
}

And the caller can do any of these:

public SomeClass
{
    [Dependency]
    public ITest test { get; set; }

    // not the best, but should still work due to finalizer.
    public string Method1(int value)
    {
        return this.test.TestMethod(value);
    }

    // the good way to do it
    public string Method2(int value)
    {
        using(ITest t = unityContainer.Resolve<ITest>())
        {
            return t.TestMethod(value);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You never make use of the parameter disposing in your Dispose method –  CaffGeek May 19 '10 at 14:27
    
@Chad - I was following Microsoft's common Finalize/Dispose design pattern: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/b1yfkh5e%28VS.71%29.aspx It is true that I am not using the variable though, because I don't need to do any different cleanup between a normal dispose and a finalize. It could be rewritten to just have Finalize call Dispose() and move the code from Dispose(bool) to Dispose(). –  CodingWithSpike May 20 '10 at 14:16
    
Finalizers add overhead, and aren't deterministic. I avoid them whenever possible. You can use Unity's automatic factories to inject delegates and put those in using blocks, or (better) hide the create/call/dispose service behavior behind a method on an injected interface. Each call to the dependency creates the proxy, calls it, and disposes of it. –  TrueWill Aug 24 '12 at 20:50

I referred few answers on this post and customized it as per my needs.

I wanted the ability to do something with WCF client before using it so the DoSomethingWithClient() method.

public interface IServiceClientFactory<T>
{
    T DoSomethingWithClient();
}
public partial class ServiceClient : IServiceClientFactory<ServiceClient>
{
    public ServiceClient DoSomethingWithClient()
    {
        var client = this;
        // do somthing here as set client credentials, etc.
        //client.ClientCredentials = ... ;
        return client;
    }
}

Here is the helper class:

public static class Service<TClient>
    where TClient : class, ICommunicationObject, IServiceClientFactory<TClient>, new()
{
    public static TReturn Use<TReturn>(Func<TClient, TReturn> codeBlock)
    {
        TClient client = default(TClient);
        bool success = false;
        try
        {
            client = new TClient().DoSomethingWithClient();
            TReturn result = codeBlock(client);
            client.Close();
            success = true;
            return result;
        }
        finally
        {
            if (!success && client != null)
            {
                client.Abort();
            }
        }
    }
}

And I can use it as:

string data = Service<ServiceClient>.Use(x => x.GetData(7));
share|improve this answer
    
What's about Client constructor using binding and endpoing ? TClient(binding, endpoing) –  Kiquenet Nov 12 '13 at 11:32

I have my own wrapper for a channel which implements Dispose as follows:

public void Dispose()
{
        try
        {
            if (channel.State == CommunicationState.Faulted)
            {
                channel.Abort();
            }
            else
            {
                channel.Close();
            }
        }
        catch (CommunicationException)
        {
            channel.Abort();
        }
        catch (TimeoutException)
        {
            channel.Abort();
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            channel.Abort();
            throw;
        }
}

This seems to work well and allows a using block to be used.

share|improve this answer

You could also use a DynamicProxy to extend the Dispose() method. This way you could do something like:

using (var wrapperdProxy = new Proxy<yourProxy>())
{
   // Do whatever and dispose of Proxy<yourProxy> will be called and work properly.
}
share|improve this answer

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