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Possible Duplicate:
How do you remove duplicates from a list in Python whilst preserving order?

I was curios about the question: Eliminate consecutive duplicates of list elements, and how it should be implemented in Python.

What I came up with is this:

list = [1,1,1,1,1,1,2,3,4,4,5,1,2]
i = 0

while i < len(list)-1:
    if list[i] == list[i+1]:
        del list[i]
    else:
        i = i+1

Output:

[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 1, 2]

Which I guess is ok.

So I got curious, and wanted to see if I could delete the elements that had consecutive duplicates and get this output:

[2, 3, 5, 1, 2]

For that i did this:

list = [1,1,1,1,1,1,2,3,4,4,5,1,2]
i = 0
dupe = False

while i < len(list)-1:
    if list[i] == list[i+1]:
        del list[i]
        dupe = True
    elif dupe:
        del list[i]
        dupe = False
    else:
        i += 1

But it seems sort of clumsy and not pythonic, do you have any smarter / more elegant / more efficient way to implement this?

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by S.Lott, John Machin, Trufa, Jeff Atwood Apr 23 '11 at 22:57

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
This was asked in the same course last year about this time. Search and you'll find all the previous versions of this question. Really. –  S.Lott Apr 21 '11 at 2:45
    
@S.Lott: Thanks I'll delete the question if I find any duplicates and if there is no interesting (new) answer by then. –  Trufa Apr 21 '11 at 2:48
    
All of these: stackoverflow.com/search?q=%5Bpython%5D+duplicates+list are duplicates of your question. Every single one of them. –  S.Lott Apr 21 '11 at 9:51
    
@S.Lott: Voted to close myself. Thanks. –  Trufa Apr 23 '11 at 22:43
    
It should be noted that the quiestion given as “Possible Duplicate“ above, is not a duplicate. That is a question about removing dupes hile preserving the order, while this is about consecutive dupes –  leo Nov 12 '14 at 11:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted
>>> L=[1,1,1,1,1,1,2,3,4,4,5,1,2]
>>> from itertools import groupby
>>> [x[0] for x in groupby(L)]
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 1, 2]

If you wish, you can use map instead of the LC

>>> from operator import itemgetter
>>> map(itemgetter(0), groupby(L))
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 1, 2]

For the second part

>>> [x for x,y in groupby(L) if len(list(y))<2]
[2, 3, 5, 1, 2]

If you don't want to create the temporary list just to take the length, you can use sum over a generator expression

>>> [x for x,y in groupby(L) if sum(1 for i in y)<2]
[2, 3, 5, 1, 2]
share|improve this answer
    
Nice, thank for the edit! +1! –  Trufa Apr 21 '11 at 2:50

Here's a blunt 1-liner, operates more quickly than any suggestion so far:

>>>l = [1,1,1,1,1,1,2,3,4,4,5,1,2]

>>>[j for i,j in enumerate(l) if not (i < len(l)-1 and j is l[i+1]) and not (i > 0 and j is l[i-1])]

[2,3,5,1,2]

or even simpler...

>>>[j for i,j in enumerate(l) if l[i:].count(j) == 1 and l[:i].count(j) is 0]

Change the previous '==' to '>' and you'll have a list of duplicates.

Or for ignoring consecutives...

>>>[i for i in l if l.count(i) is 1]

share|improve this answer
1  
I once posted a listcomp like the second and third here (using lst.count(i) on every element) and got skewered for its quadratic performance. The second and third here appear to be vulnerable to the same criticism: they would get progressively slower on bigger lists due to the repeated calls to list.count. –  twneale Apr 22 '11 at 2:20
    
-1 Using is instead of == –  John Machin Apr 22 '11 at 2:53

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