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.class {    -webkit-column-count: 4;
    -webkit-column-gap: 0.25in;
    -webkit-column-rule-width : 1px;
    -webkit-column-rule-style : solid;
    -webkit-column-rule-color : #eee;
}

So it works perfectly in Safari, but when printing, the 4 columns turn into a single column spanning multiple pages. Any ideas?

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This is very frustrating. I've been working on a solution for a few hours now and it looks like I'll have to take a different route entirely. The WebKit implementation (including the latest build, which I just checked, Chrome and wkhtmltopdf) have CSS3 columns turned off (see Peter's answer). Firefox actually renders them correctly, but I have no idea how to access that efficiently programatically :-( Bad times. –  LaceCard Oct 6 '13 at 11:58
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2 Answers 2

It seems like the developer of columns in Webkit (Dave Hyatt) disabled columns when printing, because he couldn't implement page breaking properly: https://www.webkit.org/blog/88/css3-multi-column-support/#comment-16854

I'm surprised that in more than 5 years, no solution has been found...

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That's very interesting because I've run into a similar problem that I'll have to end up implementing as a custom solution. It's pretty annoying there is not a solution yet. –  Nick Fleker Felker Nov 12 '13 at 4:12
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the print and web page are 2 different things. So try to use diff css for print pages and try to see

page-break css properties. it will come in handy


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