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It happens so that I have a need of the infamous singleton pattern. Better yet, it happens so that I have a need of infamous C++ templates in combination with that pattern. So, what troubles me is this:

template <class T>
class PDatabaseTable
{
    ...

    static PDatabaseTable <T> & instance()
    {
        static PDatabaseTable <T> singleton;
        return singleton;
    }

    ...
};

This is a typical way to implement a singleton that's supposed to be created on the first use. Now, here we have a static variable singleton. Since the instance() function may be called from several different modules, the question is: will there be only one instance of the object for any given type T, or will every module instantiate its very own singleton?

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2  
you could test this very easily by putting a breakpoint in the constructor for a particular PDatabaseTable<T>, and then accessing instance from different modules. –  Vusak Apr 21 '11 at 5:00
    
Standard 3.2p5: If the definitions of D satisfy all these requirements [the version of One Definition Rule for things that belong in header files], then the program shall behave as if there were a single definition of D. –  aschepler Jan 8 '13 at 21:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

There will only be one instance for each type T, just as, if it weren't a template, there would only be one instance.

The function is inline, meaning that although it can be defined in multiple compilation units, after linking there will be only one version of it, and only one instance of any local static objects.

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I don't quite understand what inlining has to do it. I think even if the function could not be inlined, there would still be just one instance of it, right? –  gridz Apr 21 '11 at 5:04
    
@Grigory: "inline linkage" has little to do with inlining (although it is necessary to be able to inline the function). As I said, it means that the function may be defined in multiple compilation units, as long as each definition is identical. –  Mike Seymour Apr 21 '11 at 5:10
    
* A sigh of relief * :) –  Septagram Apr 21 '11 at 5:39
    
Inline isn't a type of linkage in C++. Presumably you meant external linkage? –  Charles Bailey Apr 21 '11 at 6:02
    
@Charles: I must be going mad. I was sure it was a linkage type, but you're right, it isn't. –  Mike Seymour Apr 21 '11 at 6:13

Your singleton is called Meyers Singleton and you can find an explanation about thread safety of this singleton type in Static locals and threadsafety in g++ article which nicely explains how static local variables are thread-safe to create.

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I was concerned about (possible) multiple instantiation, not thread safety. But that's my bad. Thread safety is important, and you make valid point here, so +1. –  Septagram Apr 21 '11 at 6:47

Definitely there will be only one instance.

I am just wondering why can't you move that static object out of function to the class body ?

template <class T>
class PDatabaseTable
{
  static PDatabaseTable <T> singleton;
  static PDatabaseTable <T> & instance()
  {
    return singleton;
  }
};
template<class T>
PDatabaseTable<T> PDatabaseTable<T>::singleton;
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2  
Lazy initialization is the keyword here. And the advantage, that you yourself select the order in which these singletons are created. –  Xeo Apr 21 '11 at 5:08
    
also, if it's in the class body, I'll also have to explicitly define it in one of the modules for every type T. At the moment, enough magic is required to use these classes as it is. And yes, lazy initialization is important here, because of the dependencies. –  Septagram Apr 21 '11 at 5:18
    
@Septagram, lazy initialization is a valid cause. But I suspect, if you have to declare for every type. Since the variable is already being accessed in instance(). If the call to instance() is existing, the object will also exist. –  iammilind Apr 21 '11 at 5:23
    
@Septagram - You don't have to define the singleton yourself. As it is a template it is done by compiler magic, just like your static variable inside the function. Initialization order might be a problem though. –  Bo Persson Apr 21 '11 at 9:31

You CAN move the init of the static outside of the class body, and this is also possible for the static function.

template <typename T>
class Singleton
{
public:
  static Singleton<T>* Singleton::getInstance();
  T* getMember() { member_; }
protected:
  Singleton() { member_ = new T; }
  ~Singleton() { if (singleton_) delete member_; }
private:
  static Singleton<T>* singleton_;
  T* member_;
};
template <typename T>
Singleton<T>* Singleton<T>::getInstance()
{
  if (NULL == singleton_) singleton_ = new Singleton;
  return singleton_;
}
template <typename T>
Singleton<T>* Singleton<T>::singleton_ = NULL;
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I don't see what that change would help. And you've violated the Rule Of Three. –  aschepler Jan 8 '13 at 21:07

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