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I am not a great UI designer, so I thought I'd throw this out to those who are better at designing interfaces that are usable and have the potential to look good.

I have a public page on a site that has a lot of copy (as in copywriting). The section consists of 7 big sections. Each section has many paragraphs, and possibly some images.

Now, the section title is a little unconventional in that they are quite long - they are actually full length questions being asked of the user. I guess the idea is that when they scan over the questions, they will read the paragraphs below if it applies to them.

If I just put all the sections on the same page, the page turns out to be really long. I don't think users are going to scroll down to question 5-7.

I don't see how I can put these "questions" in a conventional "left side bar" menu because it would simply take too much space vertically across the screen.

Does anyone have any suggestions on how to design such a page so that it minimizes or completely eliminates scrolling, allows the user to scan the 7 questions, allows the user to read all the text, etc. very easily?

I can use javascript if I need to. I am just not very creative when it comes to UI, so I don't know what to do. It's not really a question of how - it's more of a creativity problem. I am a server-side programmer LOL.

If you can actually provide a few examples online of successful/profitable sites that demonstrate your solution, that would be a bonus ;)

Thanks!

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4 Answers

You could give each question a header (a short version of the original question) and collapse the long version. With a "+" sign in front of or a "read full question" link below the header you indicate there is more text.

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I suggest cutting the questions off at a certain number of characters and add "..." to the end. If the user hovers over the text, expand the question. See http://api.jquery.com/hover/ for a start.

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Well, since this marketing, it's actually pretty important to show the full question. The "..." in this case would be the actual paragraphs - not so much the question. That is actually very important I would gather. :/ –  egervari Apr 21 '11 at 7:24
    
Agree — truncation of content when users need to read the entire content is a miserable user experience. You force users to hover their mice rather than just visually scan / scroll. –  ElBel Nov 12 '13 at 22:05
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look at following links

  1. http://www.microsoft.com/visualstudio/en-us/products/2010-editions/ultimate
  2. http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/excel-help/create-or-delete-a-pivottable-or-pivotchart-report-HP010089893.aspx
  3. http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2267642

first page : contains links on left, click on link will show content on right.
second page: contains link on top, click on link will take to content, at end of content there is a link to Top third page: simillar to second but content is colapsible.

Also you can use accordian control ( http://docs.jquery.com/UI/Accordion ).
for all above solution you can use norma javascript or JQuery.

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I'm guessing that asking the marketing people to re-work the content is not an option (see http://www.nngroup.com/topic/writing-web/ for tips on writing for the web). :-/

You might consider a design that falls back on a traditional table of contents. If you can, tweak the text so that the most meaningful and unique words are on the left side of each question (i.e. don't repeat redundant information). If it helps you can bold one or two key terms from each item to facilitate scanning (Google does this in its search results for this reason).

The goal is to summarize and facilitate the proper choice, and then allow the user to navigate to the details — you can use in-page anchor links if you like. Even if the page is long that's not going to kill people; users know how to scroll (if they know there's stuff down there to scroll to). For example:

The situation that applies most to me is...

  1. I am unmarried, no kids, and I'm not taking care of of someone who's sick.
  2. I am married, and we aren't taking care of kids or sick adults.
  3. I'm married and we have kids, but aren't taking care of any adults.
  4. I've been widowed in the past 2 years and I have kids that I take care of.
  5. I was widowed more than 2 years ago, I haven't remarried, and I have kids that I take care of.
  6. I'm divorced and pay child support.

I am unmarried, no kids, and I'm not taking care of of someone who's sick.

Lorem ipsum...

I am married, and we aren't taking care of kids or sick adults.

Lorem ipsum...

<h1>The situation that applies most to me is...</h1>
<ol>
<li><a href="#x">I am <b>unmarried</b>, no kids, and I'm not taking care of of someone who's sick.</a></li>
<li><a href="#y">I am married, and we aren't taking care of kids or sick adults.</a></li>
<li><a href="#z">I'm married and we <b>have kids</b>, but aren't taking care of any adults.</a></li>
<li><a href="#a">I've been <b>widowed in the past 2 years</b> and I have kids that I take care of.</a></li>
<li><a href="#b">I was widowed <b>more than 2 years</b> ago, I haven't remarried, and I have kids that I take care of.</a></li>
<li><a href="#c">I'm <b>divorced</b> and pay child support.</a></li>
</ol>

<a name="x"></a>
<h2>I am <b>unmarried</b>, no kids, and I'm not taking care of of someone who's sick.</h2>
<p>Lorem ipsum...</p>


<a name="y"></a>
<h2>I am married, and we aren't taking care of kids or sick adults.</h2>
<p>Lorem ipsum...</p>
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More references – nngroup.com/articles/explicit-differences –  ElBel Nov 12 '13 at 22:23
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