Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the difference between signed and unsigned int?

share|improve this question
2  
This is a real question, and the answer is not so simple but rather subtle. –  R.. Apr 21 '11 at 5:36
    
Voting to reopen. It might be a duplicate, but it's definitely a real question. –  Brian Apr 21 '11 at 13:27
3  
Re: "It might be a duplicate" - What is a difference between unsigned int and signed int in C? –  eldarerathis Apr 21 '11 at 21:27
add comment

2 Answers

As you are probably aware, ints are stored internally in binary. Typically an int contains 32 bits, but in some environments might contain 16 or 64 bits (or even a different number, usually but not necessarily a power of two).

But for this example, let's look at 4-bit integers. Tiny, but useful for illustration purposes.

Since there are four bits in such an integer, it can assume one of 16 values; 16 is two to the fourth power, or 2 times 2 times 2 times 2. What are those values? The answer depends on whether this integer is a signed int or an unsigned int. With an unsigned int, the value is never negative; there is no sign associated with the value. Here are the 16 possible values of a four-bit unsigned int:

bits  value
0000    0
0001    1
0010    2
0011    3
0100    4
0101    5
0110    6
0111    7
1000    8
1001    9
1010   10
1011   11
1100   12
1101   13
1110   14
1111   15

... and Here are the 16 possible values of a four-bit signed int:

bits  value
0000    0
0001    1
0010    2
0011    3
0100    4
0101    5
0110    6
0111    7
1000   -8
1001   -7
1010   -6
1011   -5
1100   -4
1101   -3
1110   -2
1111   -1

As you can see, for signed ints the most significant bit is 1 if and only if the number is negative. That is why, for signed ints, this bit is known as the "sign bit".

share|improve this answer
4  
Perhaps worth pointing out is that this is the two's complement format, which admittedly is nowadays widely used. There are also other ways to represent signed integers, most notably one's complement. –  Schedler Apr 26 '11 at 11:59
    
Correct. And the ISO9899 C standard does not even require that either one's complement or two's complement be used; any other convention that actually works is permissible. –  Bill Evans at Mariposa Apr 26 '11 at 15:31
1  
Although two's complement is not required, (unsigned)(-1) is required to be the maximum representable value for unsigned (independent of the binary representation), which is trivially true for 2's complement, but not other representations. –  rubenvb Nov 23 '11 at 11:52
1  
@BillEvansatMariposa: The standard says that for signed integers there're 3 allowed representations: sign+magnitude, 2's complement, 1's complement. Any other would have to be invisible to the program and be perceived as one of these 3. –  Alexey Frunze Nov 23 '11 at 11:57
add comment

Sometimes we know in advance that the value stored in a given integer variable will always be positive-when it is being used to only count things, for example. In such a case we can declare the variable to be unsigned, as in, unsigned int num student;. With such a declaration, the range of permissible integer values (for a 32-bit compiler) will shift from the range -2147483648 to +2147483647 to range 0 to 4294967295. Thus, declaring an integer as unsigned almost doubles the size of the largest possible value that it can otherwise hold.

share|improve this answer
    
@Alex I was in the middle of editing that answer 10mins ago and it's identical. lol –  Skuld Nov 23 '11 at 11:54
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.