Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

hey guys i have a question about the following code:

cout << "Enter the number: ";
int number;
cin >> number;
cout << "Enter names: ";
string names;
getline(cin, names);

i need the program to take the entire line of user input and put it into string names. with the cin >>number before the getline() command however (which i'm guessing is the issue), it won't allow me to input names. i heard something about a cin.clear() command, but i have no idea how does works or why this is even necessary. would someone kindly explain this to me? thank you so much.

share|improve this question
2  
Assuming you typed: 5<enter>John<enter>. Then cin >> number reads JUST 5. leaving the new-line (enter) character on the stream. Thus when you try and read the name with getline(cin,name) it reads to the end of line. BUT NOTE there is a new-line character just there ready to be read (thus names will be empty (because you did not read off the new-line character after the 5). If you want to switch between >> and getline() you need to be carefull about trailing end of lines on your input. –  Loki Astari Apr 21 '11 at 8:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
cout << "Enter the number: ";
int number;
if (cin >> number)
{
    cout << "Enter names: ";
    string names;
    // keep getting lines until fail or one's not empty...
    while (getline(cin, names))
        if (names != "")
        {
            // good so far...

            break;
        }
}

std::cin.clear() isn't necessary for this, but is useful for removing error state. For example, if you want to give the user many chances to enter a number:

int x;
while (true)
{
    std::cout << "Enter a number: ";
    if (std::cin >> x)
        break;
    else if (std::cin.eof())
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    std::cin.clear();
}
share|improve this answer
cout << "Enter the number: ";
int number;
cin >> number;

cin.ignore(256, '\n'); // remaining input characters up to the next newline character
                       // are ignored

cout << "Enter names: ";
string names;
getline(cin, names);
share|improve this answer

Try:

int number;

cin >> number;

char firstCharacterOfNames;
cin >> firstCharacterOfNames;  // This will discard all leading white space.
                               // including new-line if there happen to be any.

cin.unget();                   // Put back the first character of the name.

std::string  names;
std::getline(cin, names);      // Read the names;

Alternatively. If you know that number and names will always be on different lines.

cin >> number;
cin.ignore(std::numeric_limits<std::streamsize>::max(), '\n'); 
std::getline(cin, names);
share|improve this answer

Another way of doing it is to put a

cin.ignore ( std::numeric_limits<std::streamsize>::max(), '\n' ); 

after your cin>>number; to flush the input buffer completely (rejecting all of the extra characters until a newline is found). You need to #include <limits> to get the max() method.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I was just wondering what's the maximum streamsize :-) –  cnicutar Apr 21 '11 at 5:55
    
@jonsca: "rejecting all the extra characters" is dubious in most production systems... fine to eat whitespace, but discarding unknown data can easily and silently lead to wrong results. –  Tony D Apr 21 '11 at 6:03
    
@cnicutar it varies from implementation to implementation –  jonsca Apr 21 '11 at 6:08
    
@Tony How about instead of a getline, if you have a loop taking in characters positioned after the cin statement? Surely the extra characters will throw a wrench into that. Are you talking more about security holes? –  jonsca Apr 21 '11 at 6:10
1  
"loop taking in characters"... if you mean while (isspace(cin.peek())) cin.ignore()... looks good to me. Re above, I was thinking more of a user misunderstanding the input format requirements, or some script generating the input breaks, but the broken input seem to be processed successfully because it's ignored - they can end up trusting broken results. If input's not to spec, it's better to have your program generate an error. –  Tony D Apr 21 '11 at 6:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.