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Let's imagine we have several type of elements, and we want to create a 'manager' for every type of them. The manager takes care of the creation, activation/deactivation and removal for any of the elements (we assume the user will no create/destroy the instances of these elements without using the manager. A very simple example of the code would be something like this:

template <class T>
class NonCachedElementMngr
{
public:
    NonCachedElementMngr():
        rmCounter(0)
    {}

    ~ NonCachedElementMngr()
    {
        T* element = 0;
        if(mElements.size() > 0)
        {
            typename std::set<T*>::iterator it;
            for(it = mElements.begin(); it != mElements.end(); ++it)
            {
                element = *it;
                element->deactivate();
                delete element;
            }
        }
    }

    T* create()
    {
        T* element = new T();
        element->activate();
        mElements.insert(element);
        return element;
    }

    bool release(T* element)
    {
        bool ret = false;
        typename std::set<T*>::iterator it;
        it = mElements.find(element);
        if(it != mElements.end())
        {
            element->deactivate();
            delete element;
            mElements.erase(it);
            ret = true;
        }
        return ret;
    }

private:

    std::set<T*> mElements;
    int rmCounter;
};

Let's imagine now that, for a subgroup of objects, apart from the basic operation, we need also to do some caching. For that subgroup of types, we could define another 'manager' like this:

template <class T>
class CachedElementMngr
{
public:
    CachedElementMngr():
        rmCounter(0)
    {}

    ~CachedElementMngr()
    {
        T* element = 0;
        if(mElements.size() > 0)
        {
            typename std::set<T*>::iterator it;
            for(it = mElements.begin(); it != mElements.end(); ++it)
            {
                element = *it;
                element->removeFromCache();  // <<<<<<<<<<<<<< Different line
                element->deactivate();
                delete element;
            }
        }
    }

    T* create()
            {
        T* element = new T();
        element->storeInCache(); // <<<<<<<<<<<<<< Different line
        element->activate();
        mElements.insert(element);
        return element;
            }

    bool release(T* element)
    {
        bool ret = false;
        typename std::set<T*>::iterator it;
        it = mElements.find(element);
        if(it != mElements.end())
        {
            element->removeFromCache();  // <<<<<<<<<<<<<< Different line
            element->deactivate();
            delete element;
            mElements.erase(it);
            ret = true;
        }
        return ret;
    }

private:

    std::set<T*> mElements;
    int rmCounter;
};

As obvious, both managers are exactly the same, except for the three lines marked as so. How could I refactor this two templates? We know at compile time if a specific type will be cacheable or not. Notice there is also a different line in the destructor. Any feasible proposal (virtual inheritance, template specialization, SFINAE...) would be very welcome.

share|improve this question
2  
Classes containing the name "manager" are often indicative of an anti-pattern. That is, the class name should describe something about what the class does. If the best definition you can find for it is "manage", then the class is probably too broad. –  Billy ONeal Apr 21 '11 at 7:58
    
Billy, that is not an answer for the question. And this is just an simple example to describe a problem, so I don't think it is important to discuss about naming at this time. The purpose of the 'manager' class is explained at the beginning of the example. –  Marda Apr 21 '11 at 8:03
1  
Yes, I know it's not an answer. That's why it's in a comment. And you're not always going to want to go back to the code you wrote to read comments about what it does later -- you're just going to want to be able to go use it. I mention this only because it's a mistake I see a lot of new (well, newer than myself) people making. –  Billy ONeal Apr 21 '11 at 8:06
    
The description of the tasks makes it clear that this "manager" implements the Factory pattern. –  MSalters Apr 21 '11 at 11:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Factor out that specific behavior into a policy:

#include <set>

struct cached_tag;
struct noncached_tag;

template<typename Tag>
struct ElementMngrCachePolicy;

template<>
struct ElementMngrCachePolicy<cached_tag>
{
    template<typename T>
    static void removeFromCache(T* const element) { /*impl...*/ }

    template<typename T>
    static void storeInCache(T* const element) { /*impl...*/ }
};

template<>
struct ElementMngrCachePolicy<noncached_tag>
{
    template<typename T>
    static void removeFromCache(T* const) { /*do nothing*/ }

    template<typename T>
    static void storeInCache(T* const) { /*do nothing*/ }
};

template<typename T, typename CachePolicy>
class ElementMngr
{
    typedef std::set<T*> elements_t;

public:
    ElementMngr() :
        rmCounter()
    { }

    ~ElementMngr()
    {
        for (typename elements_t::iterator it = mElements.begin(); it != mElements.end(); ++it)
        {
            T* const element = *it;
            CachePolicy::removeFromCache(element);
            element->deactivate();
            delete element;
        }
    }

    T* create()
    {
        T* const element = new T();
        CachePolicy::storeInCache(element);
        element->activate();
        mElements.insert(element);
        return element;
    }

    bool release(T* const element)
    {
        typename elements_t::iterator it = mElements.find(element);
        if (it == mElements.end())
            return false;

        CachePolicy::removeFromCache(element);
        element->deactivate();
        delete element;
        mElements.erase(it);
        return true;
    }

private:
    elements_t mElements;
    int rmCounter;
};

template<typename T>
class CachedElementMngr : public ElementMngr<T, ElementMngrCachePolicy<cached_tag> >
{ };

template<typename T>
class NonCachedElementMngr : public ElementMngr<T, ElementMngrCachePolicy<noncached_tag> >
{ };
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for a complete policy (aspect oriented programming) example. –  Billy ONeal Apr 21 '11 at 8:10
    
This is hardly extensible... it is better to use policies on the opposite end, where deactivate means just deactivate or removeFromCache and deactivate. There is a clear concept of deactivation that might or not imply removal from cache, I find it artificial to add a call to removeFromCache that might be empty. Also, what if you have an extra register/deregister, will you add another policy and modify the base template to have a line: Registration::removeFromRegistry call? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 21 '11 at 8:30
    
@David Rodríguez : The code example was to demonstrate how to make a policy class, not to actually make a useful/sane one. I don't know anything about the OP's requirements, but they should be able to take the concept demonstrated here and make a sensible policy class for their requirements with the appropriate level of abstraction on their own. –  ildjarn Apr 21 '11 at 8:33
    
@dribeas && @ildjarn: As already said to Billy, this code is just an example to explain a specific problem, and does not intend to be the representation of a good design. Thanks for all the answers –  Marda Apr 21 '11 at 14:51

Use a policy class...

template <class T, typename Policy>
class ElementMngr
{
    ~ElementMngr()
    {
        T* element = 0;
        if(mElements.size() > 0)
        {
            typename std::set<T*>::iterator it;
            for(it = mElements.begin(); it != mElements.end(); ++it)
            {
                element = *it;
                Policy::cleanup(element);
                delete element;
            }
        }
    }

    T* create()
            {
        T* element = new T();
        Policy::init(element);
        mElements.insert(element);
        return element;
            }

    bool release(T* element)
    {
        bool ret = false;
        typename std::set<T*>::iterator it;
        it = mElements.find(element);
        if(it != mElements.end())
        {
            Policy::release(element);
            delete element;
            mElements.erase(it);
            ret = true;
        }
        return ret;
    }
};

Then define two policies, both implementing the init(), cleanup() and release() methods, but one does the extra line, the other doesn't...

EDIT: fixed my pseudo code so that it's more like real code, I wanted to show that you can make Policy depend on T too, and then use for example specialization for specific T, or you don't have to - you can decide how to define the policy....

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the policy idea -- forgot about that in my answer. (Edited it to point to you) –  Billy ONeal Apr 21 '11 at 8:10
    
The syntax in the template is wrong, the second argument should be class Policy (most probably) or template <typename> class Policy (less probably, I don't see a reason to make this argument a template) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 21 '11 at 8:26
    
class Policy<T> is nonsensical for this -- the policy relates to the ElementMngr, not to T. I.e., the policy doesn't change because T does, so T shouldn't be an argument to the policy template. –  ildjarn Apr 21 '11 at 8:31
    
It's to convey the intention (as I did not insert the full policy class) that it could be dependent on T, it doesn't have to, but I don't see why not? You can have a general policy and the specialize for specific type... I'll edit my answer to make the intention clearer... –  Nim Apr 21 '11 at 9:24

You have any number of options, but the basic idea is to add polymorphism.

For runtime polymorphism, you have these general choices:

  • Strategy Pattern
  • Store functors defining whether or not to use the cache (i.e. with std::function s)
  • Template method (which has nothing to do with C++ templates)

You could also use compile time polymorphism, as detailed in Nim's answer

For an example, here is template method:

template <typename T>
class ElementManager
{
    std::set<T*> mElements;
    int rmCounter;
    virtual void CacheStore(T& element) = 0;
    virtual void CacheRemove(T& element) = 0;
public:
    ElementManager():
        rmCounter(0)
    {}

    ~ElementManager()
    {
        T* element = 0;
        if(mElements.size() > 0)
        {
            typename std::set<T*>::iterator it;
            for(it = mElements.begin(); it != mElements.end(); ++it)
            {
                element = *it;
                CacheRemove(element);
                element->deactivate();
                delete element;
            }
        }
    }

    T* create()
            {
        T* element = new T();
        CacheStore(element);
        element->activate();
        mElements.insert(element);
        return element;
            }

    bool release(T* element)
    {
        bool ret = false;
        typename std::set<T*>::iterator it;
        it = mElements.find(element);
        if(it != mElements.end())
        {
            CacheRemove(element);
            element->deactivate();
            delete element;
            mElements.erase(it);
            ret = true;
        }
        return ret;
    }
}

template <class T>
class CachedElementMngr : public ElementManager<T>
{
    virtual void CacheStore(T& element)
    {
        element->storeInCache();
    }

    virtual void CacheRemove(T& element)
    {
        element->removeFromCache();
    }
};

template <class T>
class NonCachedElementMngr : public ElementManager<T>
{
    virtual void CacheStore(T& element)
    {
        //Purposely Empty
    }

    virtual void CacheRemove(T& element)
    {
        //Purposely Empty
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
Billy, thanks for your answer. That is the first idea that came to my mind too, but I can't use polymorphism in this case, as I need to call the virtual function in the destructor of the base class. –  Marda Apr 21 '11 at 8:09
    
@Marda: Ah, good point. Template method won't work for you here. But the other two runtime options will work (their polymorphic behavior is external to the object being destroyed), as well as the compile time option. –  Billy ONeal Apr 21 '11 at 8:15

Specifically from the example, it seems that class CachedElementMngr completely contains all the functionality of class NonCachedElementMngr except those 3 lines mentioned. I would do something like this:

template<typename T>
class NonCachedElementMngr
{
  /* put all content of "CachedElementMngr" in your example and below methods */
  virtual void removeFromCache(T* p) { /* empty */ }
  virtual void storeInCache(T* p) { /* empty */ }
  virtual ~NonCachedElementMngr() { /*retain original */ }
};

template<typename T>
class CachedElementMngr : public NonCachedElementMngr<T>
{
// everything is inherited; just add below methods in this class
  virtual void removeFromCache(T* p) { p->removeFromCache(); }
  virtual void storeInCache(T* p) { p->storeInCache(); }
  virtual ~CachedElementMngr() { /*retain original */ }
};

And intead of calling following method as,

p->removeFromCache();
p->storeInCache();

it should be called as

removeFromCache(p);
storeInCache(p);
share|improve this answer
    
The answer is not correct: I cannot use virtual inheritance, as I am calling to my derived function in the destructor –  Marda Apr 21 '11 at 9:23
    
@Marda, thanks for pointing it. I have modified it. Missed the point of destructors. –  iammilind Apr 21 '11 at 9:32

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