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I have a table of records which each store a Colour Name. e.g:

Product    |  Colour
-------------------
Product A  |  Blue
Product B  |  Black

I have added 3 new columns: R,G & B. How can I convert the Colours into RGB values using a single SQL query?

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1  
There is no inbuilt SQL Server function to get RGB values from a colour name. Do you have a table of mappings already? –  Martin Smith Apr 21 '11 at 10:31
    
If you are asking how to convert "Blue" to an RGB value...You can't. Not in SQL anyway. The only way you can do it is to map each colour name to a set of RGB values, but this will need to be input by hand. –  anothershrubery Apr 21 '11 at 10:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
;with Colours(Name, R, G, B) as
(
  select 'White',   255, 255, 255 union all
  select 'Silver',  192, 192, 192 union all
  select 'Gray',    128, 128, 128 union all
  select 'Black',   0  , 0  , 0   union all
  select 'Red',     255, 0  , 0   union all
  select 'Maroon',  128, 0  , 0   union all
  select 'Yellow',  255, 255, 0   union all
  select 'Olive',   128, 128, 0   union all
  select 'Lime',    0  , 255, 0   union all
  select 'Green',   0  , 128, 0   union all
  select 'Aqua',    0  , 255, 255 union all
  select 'Teal',    0  , 128, 128 union all
  select 'Blue',    0  , 0  , 255 union all
  select 'Navy',    0  , 0  , 128 union all
  select 'Fuchsia', 255, 0  , 255 union all
  select 'Purple',  128, 0  , 128
)
update P set
  R = C.R,
  G = C.G,
  B = C.B
from products as P
  inner join Colours as C
    on P.Colour = C.Name
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This is great thanks. All the system colours aren't there, but any which are missing I can just add to the CTE. Sweet, Cheers! –  Curt Apr 26 '11 at 8:32

You will need to add the RGB values for the corresponding name yourself, there is no way to derive that information from a colour name (after all what constitutes "Dark Blue"?).

You could use the CSS names for hints to build the initial look-up table.

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I think a look-up table is the best bet, because it's trivial to add to it after it's built. –  Jerry Ritcey Apr 21 '11 at 21:09

You need to decode colours to RGB values in the same query which is used to update your table. While you are not using any functions, variables or another tables this can be done using CASE expression. This is not elegant solution but it will work.

UPDATE products
SET
    r = (CASE colour
            WHEN 'Black' THEN 0
            WHEN 'Red' THEN 255
            WHEN 'Green' THEN 0
            WHEN 'Blue' THEN 0
            WHEN 'White' THEN 255
            ELSE NULL
        END),
    g = (CASE colour
            WHEN 'Black' THEN 0
            WHEN 'Red' THEN 0
            WHEN 'Green' THEN 255
            WHEN 'Blue' THEN 0
            WHEN 'White' THEN 255
            ELSE NULL
        END),
    b = (CASE colour
            WHEN 'Black' THEN 0
            WHEN 'Red' THEN 0
            WHEN 'Green' THEN 0
            WHEN 'Blue' THEN 255
            WHEN 'White' THEN 255
            ELSE NULL
        END)

Or maybe in the following way:

UPDATE products
SET
    r = (CASE
            WHEN Colour IN ('Black', 'Green', 'Blue') THEN 0
            WHEN Colour IN ('Red', 'White') THEN 255
            ELSE NULL
        END),
    g = (CASE
            WHEN Colour IN ('Black', 'Red', 'Blue') THEN 0
            WHEN Colour IN ('Green', 'White') THEN 255
            ELSE NULL
        END),
    b = (CASE
            WHEN Colour IN ('Black', 'Red', 'Green') THEN 0
            WHEN Colour IN ('Blue', 'White') THEN 255
            ELSE NULL
        END)
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