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en.onclick = setCookie('english');

Why does this get fired without even clicking on it?

I have 3 flags that should set a cookie to their language when clicked wit the last one always gets fired right away...

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Could you perhaps paste some code? –  TheGrimCoder Apr 21 '11 at 12:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Your code above evaluates setCookie('english') and puts its returned value (if any) into en.onclick. In order to assign it as an event handler, wrap it into a function:

en.onclick = function(){
   setCookie('english');
};
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Ok I understand. How can you tell the difference between one to pass somthing to a function (like you do here) Or evaluating it (like i did) –  Jarco Apr 21 '11 at 12:16
1  
@Jarco Since you're working with a callback you always need to give a function to be called. Event handlers always expect a callback. –  JohnP Apr 21 '11 at 12:18
    
Probably a novice question: What do you mean by Callback? –  Jarco Apr 21 '11 at 12:24
1  
@Jarco: If there are brackets after the function name (with or without parameters), that means you're evaluating it. To pass a function as a function pointer, just use the name of the function. In my above example I created an anonymous inline function and put that function's pointer into en.onclick. –  DarthJDG Apr 21 '11 at 12:26
    
Ok. Its just a matter of what is possible and what is not with javascript. Thanks. I understand this a lot better now. –  Jarco Apr 21 '11 at 12:35

Well that's because you're running the method and assigning the result to en.onclick.

What you probably want to do us

en.onclick = function(){setCookie('english');};
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Because you're invoking the method setCookie(...). Try this:

en.onclick = setCookie;

With the brackets you're invoking the method; without you're handing it as an object.

Or try this:

en.onclick = function() { setCookie('english') };

Here we create a new function which calls setCookie with the appropriate argument.

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cause you must use something like that

en.onclick=function(){
  setCookie('english');
}
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