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Which is faster:

private static boolean isFinite(float x) {
    return !(x != x || x == Float.POSITIVE_INFINITY || x == Float.NEGATIVE_INFINITY);
}

or

private static boolean isFinite(float x) {
    return Float.NEGATIVE_INFINITY < x && x < Float.POSITIVE_INFINITY;
}

?

I tried some microbenchmarks, but the results seem fishy.

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1  
I hope you followed the suggestions found in this question. –  Joachim Sauer Apr 21 '11 at 12:25
    
Yep +1 for Joachim. Writing micro benchmarks for a JIT is far harder than most uninitiated think which always leads to extremely useless results. –  Voo Apr 21 '11 at 12:37
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would expect the second one to be faster as it does less comparisons. However the difference is so small, the timing results will be very dependant on how you benchmark.

I would go with what you believe is clearest and simplest and the JVM is likely to optimise this best.

EDIT: The problem with micro-benchmarking is that how you test can impact the results.

private static boolean isFinite1(float x) {
    return Float.NEGATIVE_INFINITY < x && x < Float.POSITIVE_INFINITY;
}

private static boolean isFinite2(float x) {
    return !(x != x || x == Float.POSITIVE_INFINITY || x == Float.NEGATIVE_INFINITY);
}


public static void main(String[] args) {
    int nums = 10000;
    int runs = 10000;
    float[] floats = new float[nums];
    for (int i = 0; i < nums; i++) {
        double d = Math.random();
        floats[i] = d < 0.01 ? Float.NaN :
                d < 0.02 ? Float.NEGATIVE_INFINITY :
                        d < 0.03 ? Float.POSITIVE_INFINITY : (float) d;
    }

    for (int n = 0; n < 10; n++) {
        {
            int count1 = 0, count2 = 0;
            long timeA = System.nanoTime();
            for (int i = 0; i < runs; i++)
                for (float f : floats)
                    if (isFinite1(f)) count1++;

            long timeB = System.nanoTime();
            for (int i = 0; i < runs; i++)
                for (float f : floats)
                    if (isFinite2(f)) count2++;

            long timeC = System.nanoTime();

            long total1 = timeB - timeA;
            long total2 = timeC - timeB;
            assert count1 == count2;

            System.out.printf("1,2: isFinite1 took %.1f ns and isFinite2 took %.1f ns on average%n", (double) total1 / runs / nums, (double) total2 / runs / nums);
        }

        {
            int count1 = 0, count2 = 0;
            long timeA = System.nanoTime();
            for (int i = 0; i < runs; i++)
                for (float f : floats)
                    if (isFinite2(f)) count1++;

            long timeB = System.nanoTime();
            for (int i = 0; i < runs; i++)
                for (float f : floats)
                    if (isFinite1(f)) count2++;

            long timeC = System.nanoTime();

            long total1 = timeB - timeA;
            long total2 = timeC - timeB;
            assert count1 == count2;

            System.out.printf("2,1: isFinite1 took %.1f ns and isFinite2 took %.1f ns on average%n", (double) total1 / runs / nums, (double) total2 / runs / nums);
        }
    }
}

prints

1,2: isFinite1 took 1.5 ns and isFinite2 took 5.1 ns on average
2,1: isFinite1 took 3.6 ns and isFinite2 took 4.4 ns on average
1,2: isFinite1 took 1.5 ns and isFinite2 took 5.1 ns on average
2,1: isFinite1 took 3.6 ns and isFinite2 took 4.4 ns on average
1,2: isFinite1 took 1.5 ns and isFinite2 took 5.2 ns on average
2,1: isFinite1 took 3.6 ns and isFinite2 took 4.4 ns on average

As you can see, even the order I test these makes a big difference.

Far more important than the operations involved is to optimise the number of branches and how well branch prediction will work. http://www.agner.org/optimize/microarchitecture.pdf

Say I make the different values 25x more likely so each range is equally likely.

        floats[i] = d < 0.25 ? Float.NaN :
                d < 0.5 ? Float.NEGATIVE_INFINITY :
                d < 0.75 ? Float.POSITIVE_INFINITY : (float) d;

All this does is increase the chance of the code going through a different path.

1,2: isFinite1 took 8.5 ns and isFinite2 took 14.2 ns on average
2,1: isFinite1 took 10.9 ns and isFinite2 took 11.5 ns on average
1,2: isFinite1 took 7.2 ns and isFinite2 took 14.4 ns on average
2,1: isFinite1 took 11.0 ns and isFinite2 took 11.5 ns on average
1,2: isFinite1 took 7.3 ns and isFinite2 took 14.2 ns on average
2,1: isFinite1 took 10.8 ns and isFinite2 took 11.5 ns on average

I repeat, clearer code should be your goal! ;)

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Are you sure this will be faster than doing it the canonical way?

Float.isInfinite(f) ? false : Float.isNaN(f) ? false : true
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