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What i am trying to is to do something like this:

Print \ then | then / then _ and it goes on in a loop. Here is my code:

#include <stdio.h>  

int main()  
{ 
   while(1)
   {
           printf("\\");
           printf("|");
           printf("/");
           printf("_");
   }
   return 0;  
}

The problem i face is that it prints it in a sequence, how do i make it print at the same cursor position with some time delay in C or C++?

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1  
Please #include <cstdio>, not #include <stdio.h>, when writing C++. – PreferenceBean Apr 21 '11 at 12:53
up vote 4 down vote accepted

I don't properly understand what you mean by How to make cursor rotate? But were you by any chance wanting to do something like this:

#include <stdio.h>  
#include <time.h>  

#define mydelay 100

void delay(int m)
{
    clock_t wait = m+ clock();
    while (wait > clock());
}


int main()  
{  
   while(1)
   {
           printf("\\\b");
           delay(mydelay);
           printf("|\b");
           delay(mydelay);
           printf("/\b");
           delay(mydelay);
           printf("_\b");
           delay(mydelay);
   }

   return 0;  
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1. Nice. I was thinking of it. – Nawaz Apr 21 '11 at 12:36
    
Yes, but it's completely dependent on the environment whether this works or not. And clock() usually measures CPU time for the process, not wall time. – PreferenceBean Apr 21 '11 at 12:54
    
@Nawaz:: Thanks. – Sadiq Apr 21 '11 at 13:19
#include <stdio.h>  

int main()  
{ 
   while(1)
   {
           printf("\\");  printf("%c", 8); // 8 is the backspace ASCII code.
           printf("|");  printf("%c", 8);  // %c is the printf format string for single character
           printf("/");  printf("%c", 8);  // assuming output to a terminal that understands
           printf("_");  printf("%c", 8);  // Backspace processing,  this works.
   }
   return 0;  
}

If you need a delay, then add a call to your own delay function that busy-waits, or calls sleep, or does some other processing.

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#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>    /* for sleep() */

int main(void)
{
  fprintf(stderr,"Here we are:  ");

  while(1)
  {
    fprintf(stderr,"\b\\");
    sleep(1);
    fprintf(stderr,"\b|");
    sleep(1);
    fprintf(stderr,"\b/");
    sleep(1);
    fprintf(stderr,"\b-");
    sleep(1);
  }

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

You can add a backspace character (\b) after printing, though whether this works is completely up to the environment where your program's output is being displayed.

You'll also want to introduce a delay so that you can actually see the changes (though this may happen naturally, as part of your wider algorithm).

#include <cstdio>
#include <cstdlib>

int main()  
{ 
   while(1) {
           printf("\\\b"); sleep(1);
           printf("|\b");  sleep(1);
           printf("/\b");  sleep(1);
           printf("_\b");  sleep(1);
   }
   return 0;  
}

You could also look into the curses library for proper text-based GUI fu.

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You could add a carriage return to the beginning of you stings.

e.g.

printf("\r|");
sleep(1);

or add a backspace after printing.-

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In C you can print a backspace character using '\b' or ascii value 8. Use that before each print. I guess you'll need some delay between 2 print statements.

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If you are in Linux, there is the curses library for doing this. – BiGYaN Apr 21 '11 at 12:36

There is no standard way to do this in either C or C++.

You can use a third party library like ncurses or ANSI escape sequences (if on Unix OS).

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