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I have a program where i invoke a signal sigkill(getpid(), SIGUSR1). I wish when the signal comes, instead of the signal handler the thread function should be invoked, or both. For this i have populated the sigev_notify with SIGEV_THREAD.

But unfortunately, the thread function is not called. Why is it so?

Here is the code below:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <signal.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <string.h>

static void ThreadhandlerTimer1(int);
void sig_handlerTimer1(int);

static void threadFunction(union sigval sv) // Should be invoked on receipt of signal "SIGEV_THREAD"
{
  printf("Thread function invoked");
}

int main()
{
    int i;
    static struct sigaction sa;
    static struct sigevent sevp;  

    memset (&sevp, 0, sizeof (struct sigevent));
    sevp.sigev_value.sival_ptr = NULL;
    sevp.sigev_notify = SIGEV_THREAD;
    sevp.sigev_notify_attributes = NULL;
    sevp.sigev_signo = SIGUSR1;
    sevp.sigev_notify_function=threadFunction;

    /* Setting the signal handlers */

    sa.sa_handler = sig_handlerTimer1;
    sa.sa_flags = 0;
    sigaction(SIGUSR1, &sa, NULL);

    for(i=0; i<10; i++)
    {
            if((i==3) || (i==6)){
              kill(getpid(), SIGUSR1);
            }

            printf("%d\n",i);
            sleep(1);
     }
    }

    void sig_handlerTimer1(int signum)
    {
      printf("Caught signal: %d\n",signum);
    }
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1  
How could it work? You're not passing the sevp to anything. –  Sami Lehtinen Apr 21 '11 at 14:00
    
Also, mixing threads and signals is a Very Bad Idea, generally. –  Sami Lehtinen Apr 21 '11 at 14:00
    
@Sami: Your comments "mixing threads and signals is very bad" shows that you have perhaps never worked with POSIX timers. –  kingsmasher1 Apr 22 '11 at 15:13
1  
True, that I've never done, as I've relied on poll(). I have extensive experience in fighting with signals and threads. The semantics are fuzzy, to be polite, and vary a lot between operating systems and version. Your code sample has sigaction() and thread keywords, which raise my hairs, and no sigwait(), which AFAIK is the way to go, once you start any threads. But hey, it's your program. –  Sami Lehtinen Apr 22 '11 at 22:47
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2 Answers

According to this documentation, the sigevent structure is only supported by "Some signal-generating functions, such as high-resolution timer expiration, asynchronous I/O completion, interprocess message arrival, and the sigqueue() function."

I don't know what your real plan for this code is (maybe you can tell us), but as it is, you are raising the signal directly which probably is not one of the supported cases for using SIGEV. If this code is fairly close to what you want in production you could simply call sigqueue() instead of kill() and it may just work.

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Let me try it out. –  kingsmasher1 Apr 21 '11 at 13:22
    
But why only sigqueue? –  kingsmasher1 Apr 21 '11 at 13:31
    
Sorry, that does not work. Even using sigqueue does not invoke my thread function. –  kingsmasher1 Apr 21 '11 at 13:32
    
What platform are you on? And you are compiling with -mt or something similar to enable multithreading, right? –  John Zwinck Apr 21 '11 at 13:38
    
ARM + Linux. –  kingsmasher1 Apr 22 '11 at 15:14
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From your code, it seems you have just assigned values to sigevent, instead of using any where in code.

static struct sigevent sevp;

memset (&sevp, 0, sizeof (struct sigevent));
sevp.sigev_value.sival_ptr = NULL;
sevp.sigev_notify = SIGEV_THREAD;
sevp.sigev_notify_attributes = NULL;
sevp.sigev_signo = SIGUSR1;
sevp.sigev_notify_function=threadFunction;

To invoke threadFunction, call this from your signal handler.

> void sig_handlerTimer1(int signum)
> {
>  printf("Caught signal: %d\n",signum);
>  threadFunction(signum);
> }

If you want to use sevp, use something like timer_create() and timer_settime(). Check this link: http://ptgmedia.pearsoncmg.com/images/0201633922/sourcecode/sigev_thread.c

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1  
Invoking threadFunction from a signal handler is almost surely wrong. –  R.. Apr 21 '11 at 18:57
    
ahhhh, then why not call the thread function in main itself, if i want to invoke it? Right? Do you know what is a thread function? Or what is the importance of a thread function? You really need to clear some basic elementary concepts. –  kingsmasher1 Apr 22 '11 at 6:30
    
@kingmasher1: calling nearly anything from a signal handler will be trouble. See, for example, securecoding.cert.org/confluence/display/seccode/… . –  Sami Lehtinen Apr 22 '11 at 22:57
    
@Sami: True, that's why i told Barun :), he was trying to forcefully call a thread function, which loses it's real meaning. Perhaps it's not just about calling the function, but the way how it is invoked matters most. –  kingsmasher1 Apr 23 '11 at 5:56
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