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I try to build a Eclipse plugin that has to use a self written jar which is dependent on other jars, but I don't get the point where to start with handling jars as seperate PlugIns. Anywhere I have to use just the .jar files or am I wrong?

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3 Answers 3

Project Properties -> Java Build Path -> Add External jars. Is this what you are looking for?

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This does not work for PlugIns afaik –  ethnix Apr 21 '11 at 13:43
    
Maybe try to wrap the .jar in a plugin and then just add that plugin as a dependencie. –  TomaC Apr 21 '11 at 14:18
    
exactly this is the point, i don't get; how can i wrap the jar in a plugin when this jar depends on other ones... the create plugin from jar wizard in eclipse didn't work well,as i cant import the classes from my plugin although i see it in my dependencies –  ethnix Apr 21 '11 at 14:27
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Try creating a new plug-in project. Then just copy/paste your jar file in the new project. Go to Runtime->Classpath add add the .jar. Build the project and then add it as a dependencie on your main plugin, see if you can import now. –  TomaC Apr 21 '11 at 15:08
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I just created a small test wrapper plugin over jdom. Here is the code from the wrapper manifest.mf Manifest-Version: 1.0 Bundle-ManifestVersion: 2 Bundle-Name: PluginWrapper Bundle-SymbolicName: PluginWrapper Bundle-Version: 1.0.0.qualifier Bundle-RequiredExecutionEnvironment: JavaSE-1.6 Bundle-ClassPath: jdom.jar1 . Using this wrapper I can import org.jdom packages in a test plugin. –  TomaC Apr 21 '11 at 15:57

What is a self-written jar?

Normally you turn 3rd party jars into bundles using an OSGi MANIFEST.MF (See New>Plug-in Development>Plug-in from Existing JAR archive) or you include them in your plugin.jar and add extra Bundle-ClassPath entries as mentioned by TomaC.

If you mean at runtime your plugin will create a new jar and needs to load it, that's different, though.

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this refers more precisely to a project which i exported as a runnabl jar; I also tried to use the "Plugin from Existing Jar archive"-wizard but it didn't work though. The process I want needs a xml parser e.g. and so on, if I press a button, a background process has to be called which calls a http request, parses it into xml and returns some values to the plugin –  ethnix Apr 26 '11 at 8:15
up vote 31 down vote accepted

I think I found a proper solution; the trick is that you have to implement all the files via Eclipse. I just copy here the solution which was posted to news.eclipse.platform:


Include the jars in a plugin:


  1. Use Import>File System to import the jar files into your plugin project, say in the /lib directory.
  2. Use "Add..." to add the jars to the classpath section of the plugin.xml>Runtime tab.
  3. Use "New..." to add "." library back (with no quotes, of course).
  4. make sure your binary build exports the new jar files on the plugin.xml>Build tab.
  5. save
  6. on the project, use context menu>PDE Tools>Update Classpath to correctly add the jars to the eclipse project classpath.
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What if I have two plugins that reference the same jar file...I do not want to add it twice? Can I export the package in one plugin and reference it in another? Would that be the correct way to do it? –  nbz Jun 14 '12 at 13:24
    
Instead of importing the file with Eclipse, you can also create a symlink that points from the project folder to the file's location somewhere else. For example a symlink to the local Maven repository. –  akuhn Sep 5 '13 at 1:21

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