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I've got a stored procedure, which selects 1 record back. the stored procedure could be called from several different applications on different PCs. The idea is that the stored procedure brings back the next record that needs to be processed, and if two applications call the stored proc at the same time, the same record should not be brought back. My query is below, I'm trying to write the query as efficiently as possible (sql 2008). Can it get done more efficiently than this?

CREATE PROCEDURE GetNextUnprocessedRecord
AS
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;

    --ID of record we want to select back
    DECLARE @iID BIGINT    	

    -- Find the next processable record, and mark it as dispatched
    -- Must be done in a transaction to ensure no other query can get
    -- this record between the read and update
    BEGIN TRAN

    	SELECT TOP 1
    		@iID = [ID]
    	FROM
    		--Don't read locked records, only lock the specific record
    		[MyRecords] WITH (READPAST, ROWLOCK)
    	WHERE
    		[Dispatched] is null
    	ORDER BY
    		[Received]

    	--Mark record as picked up for processing	
    	UPDATE 
    		[MyRecords]
    	SET
    		[Dispatched] = GETDATE()
    	WHERE
    		[ID] = @iID		

    COMMIT TRAN

    --Select back the specific record
    SELECT 
    	[ID],
    	[Data]
    FROM	
    	[MyRecords] WITH (NOLOCK, READPAST)
    WHERE
    	[ID] = @iID

END
share|improve this question
    
I'm not convinced this TSQL is transactionally safe... –  Mitch Wheat Feb 22 '09 at 8:07
    
try putting a WAITFOR DELAY '0:2:0' after the SELECT and before the UPDATE, run the SP and execute the same SP from another connection ... –  Mitch Wheat Feb 22 '09 at 8:17
    
actually, I'm wrong! The HOLDLOCK has the same effect as REPEATABLEREAD on the MyRecords table. –  Mitch Wheat Feb 22 '09 at 8:22
    
It better be safe by default. Otherwise there's widespread conceptual chaos on the loose. –  dkretz Feb 22 '09 at 8:43
    
I still think you would need to make the transaction SERIALIZABLE rather than REPEATABLEREAD –  Mitch Wheat Feb 22 '09 at 8:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Using the READPAST locking hint is correct and your SQL looks OK.

I'd add use XLOCK though which is also HOLDLOCK/SERIALIZABLE

...
[MyRecords] WITH (READPAST, ROWLOCK, XLOCK)
...

This means you get the ID, and exclusively lock that row while you carry on and update it.

Edit: add an index on Dispatched and Received columns to make it quicker. If [ID] (I assume it's the PK) is not clustered, INCLUDE [ID]. And filter the index too because it's SQL 2008

You could also use this construct which does it all in one go without XLOCK or HOLDLOCK

UPDATE
    MyRecords
SET
    --record the row ID
    @id = [ID],
    --flag doing stuff
    [Dispatched] = GETDATE()
WHERE
    [ID] = (SELECT TOP 1 [ID] FROM MyRecords WITH (ROWLOCK, READPAST) WHERE Dispatched IS NULL ORDER BY Received)

UPDATE, assign, set in one

share|improve this answer
    
Wonderfull tips! I've added the XLOCK hint and created a non clustered index on Received and Dispatched, and included ID with a filter of "Dispatched IS NULL". This is in addition to my clustered index on ID. I'm still trying to figure out if the Update assign set in one is faster or not. –  Jeremy Feb 23 '09 at 7:07
1  
Thank you. I'd worry more about transactional integrity than outright performance. The single statement removes the need for XLOCK. –  gbn Feb 23 '09 at 7:48

You can assign each picker process a unique id, and add columns pickerproc and pickstate to your records. Then

UPDATE MyRecords
SET pickerproc = myproc,
pickstate = 'I' -- for 'I'n process
WHERE Id = (SELECT MAX(Id) FROM MyRecords WHERE pickstate = 'A') -- 'A'vailable

That gets you your record in one atomic step, and you can do the rest of your processing at your leisure. Then you can set pickstate to 'C'omplete', 'E'rror, or whatever when it's resolved.

I think Mitch is referring to another good technique where you create a message-queue table and insert the Ids there. There are several SO threads - search for 'message queue table'.

share|improve this answer
    
that is definitely not safe! –  Mitch Wheat Feb 22 '09 at 8:51
    
And why would that be? It's not going to hand off the same MAX(Id) with pickstate 'A' until after you've changed it. At least it hasn't in my experience based on probably 10^6+ instances. –  dkretz Feb 22 '09 at 8:55
    
..and it won't be efficient either –  Mitch Wheat Feb 22 '09 at 8:57
    
I'm listening ... what's your argument? I can always learn more about SQL ... –  dkretz Feb 22 '09 at 9:00
    
@le dorfier: to make that transactionally consistent, it would need to be wrapped in a SERIALIZABLE transaction. Otherwise, there is a risk of dirty reads/non-repeatable reads/phantom reads/ –  Mitch Wheat Feb 22 '09 at 9:01

You can keep MyRecords on a "MEMORY" table for faster processing.

share|improve this answer
    
The table could get quite large, plus, what happens if the server crashes? –  Jeremy Feb 22 '09 at 19:27

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