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I got an abstract base class

public class Base
{
  public abstract String Info { get; }
}

and some children.

public class A : Base
{
  public override String Info { get { return "A does ..."; } }
}

public class B : Base
{
  public override String Info { get { return "B does ..."; } }
}

This is mere a constant but I want to make sure using Base that all classes implement it.

Now I sometimes do not have an object instance but want to access A.Info - this is not possible due it is a instance property.

Is there another way than implementing the same property on instance AND on static level? That would be feel like a duplicate violating DRY programming style.


NEW EDIT: I now see this two solutions:

public class Base
{
  public abstract String ClassInfo { get; }
}

public class A : Base
{
  public override String ClassInfo { get { return Info; } }

  public static String Info { get { return "A does ..."; } }
}

public class B : Base
{
  public override String ClassInfo { get { return Info; } }

  public static String Info { get { return "In B we do ..."; } }
}

With this I can do with any object of type Base something like object.ClassInfo but also use the value in my factory hardcoded like if(A.Info) return new A(). But I have to implement two properties for the same information in every class.

On the other hand:

public class Base
{
  public abstract String ClassInfo { get; }

  public static String GetClassInfo<T>() where T : BaseControl, new()
  {
    T obj = new T();
    return obj.ClassInfo;
  }
}

public class A : Base
{
  public override String ClassInfo { get { return "text A"; } }
}

public class B : Base
{
  public override String ClassInfo { get { return "text B"; } }    
}

Due to the abstract Base it is made sure that ClassInfo is always implemented. Calls with obj.ClassInfo and Base.GetClassInfo<A>() are okay. But with this every child of Base must have a default constructor without arguments and we loose performance with the unneccessary created instance.

Is there any other idea? Which one would you prefer and why?

share|improve this question
11  
er... public static abstract and public static override .....? that won't compile... and neither will the classes without the keyword class. I don't think we can provide a sensible answer until the question is clarified –  Marc Gravell Apr 21 '11 at 15:07
    
+1 can't override statics. –  James Michael Hare Apr 21 '11 at 15:08
    
What do you have against implementing an instance property? –  StriplingWarrior Apr 21 '11 at 15:08
    
public static override? I have a feeling that shouldn't compile.. –  Jamie Keeling Apr 21 '11 at 15:09
    
You are right, up to now I did not get to the compile step. I will edit the question. –  ZoolWay Apr 21 '11 at 15:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you need specific return results of your static properties, you're better of either

a) Instance properties 2) Attributes

In the example you've already given, you've got an instance of Base, which means you can just make the instance property virtual:

public class Base
{
    public virtual string Info { get { return "From Base"; } }
}

public class A : Base
{
    public override string Info { get { return "From A"; } }
}

If you wanted to go the attribute route, you define it as such:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Class, Inherited = true)]
public class InfoAttribute : Attribute
{
    public InfoAttribute(string info) { this.Info = info; }

    public string Info { get; private set; }
}

[InfoAttribute(Info = "From Base")]
public class Base
{
    public string GetInfo()
    {
        var attr = GetType()
            .GetCustomAttributes(typeof(InfoAttribute), true)
            .FirstOrDefault();

        return (attr == null) ? null : attr.Info;
    }
}

[InfoAttribute(Info = "From A")]
public class A : Base { }

If you wanted to call it as a static function call, you could make this change:

public static string GetInfo(Base instance)
{
    var attr = instance.GetType()
        .GetCustomAttributes(typeof(InfoAttribute), true)
        .FirstOrDefault();

    return (attr == null) ? null : attr.Info;
}

And then call it as: Base.GetInfo(instance);. All in all, not very elegant!

share|improve this answer
    
That's interesting. Can the info be called like objectA.GetInfo() and like A.GetInfo()? –  ZoolWay Apr 21 '11 at 15:17
    
It's an instance method, the other way you could do it, is make it a static function, and pass in the Base instance. I'll update the example. –  Matthew Abbott Apr 21 '11 at 15:18
    
The problem is the static call should be possible without instance by writing A.GetInfo(). I will try to have a static property with the real constant value and in Base a instance property which calls the static property through reflection. –  ZoolWay Apr 21 '11 at 17:15
    
I was not happy with your static GetInfo because of the instance. But my 2nd solution posted in the question solves this issue with a generic type parameter. So now I will combine the attribute approach with an instance GetInfo() and a static GetInfo<T>(). Will mark your answer as the solution if it works. –  ZoolWay Apr 21 '11 at 18:01
    
It works for me. I did the static GetInfo as a generic method to give it the type and no instance. I did an instance GetInfo in parallel. Compiles and unit test is satisfied, thanks! –  ZoolWay Apr 21 '11 at 18:30

Does it compiled? I don't think so. Static cannot be marked as override, virtual or abstract.

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This is not a very helpful answer. –  StriplingWarrior Apr 21 '11 at 15:10
    
I have updated my answer. –  Howard Apr 21 '11 at 15:11
    
So... you copied a piece of SLaks's answer... I'm afraid that doesn't make it much more useful. Try to contribute a new idea to the discussion. –  StriplingWarrior Apr 21 '11 at 15:13
    
I just cannot believe that you reviewed my answer so fast. Thanks. –  Howard Apr 21 '11 at 15:13

Statics can't be overridden. If you truly want to do something like that, you'd want an instance property that is virtual in the base that gets overridden in the subclasses.

share|improve this answer

This is not possible.
static members cannot be virtual or abstract.

You should make an abstract instance property.

share|improve this answer
    
An instance property works but I need the same information on instance and class level. What is best practice? Is doubling it the only solution? –  ZoolWay Apr 21 '11 at 15:16

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