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The characters allowed are A to Z, a to z, 0 to 9. The least amount of code or a single function would be best as the system is time critical on response to input.

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2  
Nice tagging there ;) –  AdrianoKF Feb 22 '09 at 9:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted
uses JclStrings;

  S := StrKeepChars('mystring', ['A'..'Z', 'a'..'z', '0'..'9']);
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2  
Note: In the latest JCL library, you would say: uses JclAnsiStrings –  David Dubois Jun 27 '12 at 12:57

If I understand you correctly you could use a function like this:

function StripNonAlphaNumeric(const AValue: string): string;
var
  SrcPtr, DestPtr: PChar;
begin
  SrcPtr := PChar(AValue);
  SetLength(Result, Length(AValue));
  DestPtr := PChar(Result);
  while SrcPtr <> #0 do begin
    if SrcPtr[0] in ['a'..'z', 'A'..'Z', '0'..'9'] then begin
      DestPtr[0] := SrcPtr[0];
      Inc(DestPtr);
    end;
    Inc(SrcPtr);
  end;
  SetLength(Result, DestPtr - PChar(Result));
end;

This will use PChar for highest speed (at the cost of less readibility).

Edit: Re the comment by gabr about using DestPtr[0] instead of DestPtr^: This should compile to the same bytes anyway, but there are nice applications in similar code, where you need to look ahead. Suppose you would want to replace newlines, then you could do something like

function ReplaceNewlines(const AValue: string): string;
var
  SrcPtr, DestPtr: PChar;
begin
  SrcPtr := PChar(AValue);
  SetLength(Result, Length(AValue));
  DestPtr := PChar(Result);
  while SrcPtr <> #0 do begin
    if (SrcPtr[0] = #13) and (SrcPtr[1] = #10) then begin
      DestPtr[0] := '\';
      DestPtr[1] := 't';
      Inc(SrcPtr);
      Inc(DestPtr);
    end else
      DestPtr[0] := SrcPtr[0];
    Inc(SrcPtr);
    Inc(DestPtr);
  end;
  SetLength(Result, DestPtr - PChar(Result));
end;

and therefore I don't usually use the ^.

BTW, does anybody have an idea how to format this in a way that the highlighting works correctly?

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I find the use of SrcPtr[0] here highly interesting - never seen such approach before. More canonical way would be to use SrcPtr^ and DestPtr^. –  gabr Feb 22 '09 at 11:26
    
Re: Formatting - maybe if you put the missing semicolon in after "DestPtr[0] := 't'" the highlighting would work. :-) –  Ken White Feb 22 '09 at 14:43
    
Thanks Ken, corrected, but it's still not working :-( The highlighter treats Delphi strings as C strings unfortunately. –  mghie Feb 22 '09 at 15:56
    
@mghie: RE Edit: That's really neat approach and something that I never thought of. Thanks for the great idea! –  gabr Feb 22 '09 at 18:33
    
I think you mean to say while SrcPtr^ <> #0 or while SrcPtr[0] <> #0. –  David Dubois Jun 27 '12 at 12:59

Just to add a remark.

The solution using a set is fine in Delphi 7, but it can cause some problems in Delphi 2009 because sets can't be of char (they are converted to ansichar).

A solution you can use is:

case key of 
  'A'..'Z', 'a'..'z', '0'..'9' : begin end; // No action
else
  Key := #0;
end;

But the most versatile way is of course:

if not ValidChar(key) then
  Key := #0;

In that case you can use ValidChar in multiple locations and if it need to be changed you only have to change it once.

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OnKeypress event

begin if not (key in ['A'..'Z','a'..'z','0'..'9']) then Key := #0; end;

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You have to validate text before using anyway. You can bypass this check using clipboard or text drag&drop. –  DiGi Feb 22 '09 at 10:23
    
The OP wants to strip a string - no mention of keyboard. –  Henk Holterman Feb 22 '09 at 11:42

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