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I wrote a 'setX' method in Java that says that if x value ( (x,y) ) is negative, the value of x wont be change, and the main() will continue as usual.

void setX (int num)
{
       if (num < 0)
            break;
       else
       {
            _x = num; 
       }
}

Am I right ? I am not sure because of the break issue, is the break statement just break from the current method ?

thnx

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7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Perhaps you meant

public void setX(int x) {
   if (x >= 0)
        _x = x; 
}
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1  
+ 1, although I prefer public void setX(int _x) { if (_x >= 0) this._x = _x; }, but I'm not really liking the fact that he's using an underscore in a variable name like that.. –  mre Apr 21 '11 at 15:45

break is used only in loops (while, for).

If you want to exit the method, use return instead.

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but the method returns nothing... it's a void –  Master C Apr 21 '11 at 15:34

you should use return. break is to break loops.

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Use return; here. break is used to break out of loops.

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According to the Java tutorial, break is for use with switch, for, while, and do-while loops. It doesn't go in if statements. For a switch the break keeps the switch from falling through to the next case, which it would otherwise do. For loops it stops looping regardless of the loop guards.

A break statement can either be unlabeled, in which case it goes to where control would normally resume after the switch or loop, or labeled, in which case it goes to the label (almost as if it were a goto with strict constraints on where it can come from).

To get out of the current method, use return. A return with no value is the proper statement to leave a void method.

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That looks like it should work, but the break really isn't doing anything anyway. why not just if(num>=0) _x = num;

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I think your intention might be a bit clearer if your logic was reversed;

void setX (int num)
{
    if (num >= 0)
        _x = num;
}
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