Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is a small test I did and the result surprised me: doing the same loop twice was approximately twice as fast as looping once. I am guessing it as because of memory access?

float* A = new float[1000000];
float* B = new float[1000000];
int h,w;
h = w = 1000;
CString txt;
double time1, time2;

time1 = Timer::instance()->getTime();
for(int j = 0; j < h; j++){
    for(int i = 0; i < w; i++){
        A[i+j*w] = 1;
        B[i+j*w] = 1;
    }
}
time2 = Timer::instance()->getTime();
txt.Format(_T("Both in same loop = %f"),time2-time1);
AfxMessageBox(txt);

time1 = Timer::instance()->getTime();
for(int j = 0; j < h; j++){
    for(int i = 0; i < w; i++){
        A[i+j*w] = 1;
    }
}
for(int j = 0; j < h; j++){
    for(int i = 0; i < w; i++){
        B[i+j*w] = 1;
    }
}
time2 = Timer::instance()->getTime();
txt.Format(_T("Different loops = %f"),time2-time1);
AfxMessageBox(txt);
share|improve this question
2  
The execution time is probably dominated by memory access, and the second version looks much more cache-friendly. –  dfan Apr 21 '11 at 15:40
    
Probably cacheing, but even if it weren't, I've seen this due to register management. It can better optimize a loop if what's in the loop is simpler. –  Mike Dunlavey Apr 21 '11 at 16:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It could be CPU cache, but more likely it's the concurrent memory access. When you access array1[x], and then immediately after that array2[x], those are two very different locations in memory and it's difficult to optimize. However array[0], array[1], array[2] etc are all in contiguous memory and much more efficient to access. Intel seems to agree.

share|improve this answer
    
Even 4 variables and 4 loops is twice as fast as one loop with the 4 variables. Is there any case in which it would be worth putting more than one variable in the same loop ? –  Simon Apr 21 '11 at 15:48
    
I can't imagine there would be, I mean in both cases you're accessing the exact same memory but when they're all in their own loops you're doing it in a more efficient manner. –  Chris Apr 21 '11 at 15:50

Might want to add an extra, untimed, loop before you start measuring time.

share|improve this answer
    
Done, but still much faster to use 2 loops. –  Simon Apr 21 '11 at 15:42

It is a matter of cache. In the loop where you access both A and B, the CPU is forced to load both in the cache, therefore having less elements of each array in it. In the other loops, the cache is full of A's (or B's) elements, so cache misses happen less often.

share|improve this answer
    
You could test that theory by making the size of the arrays much smaller, and see if you still get the same result. –  Jay Apr 21 '11 at 15:44
    
I doubt that this is correct since each element of the arrays are only written to once. If the loop were repeated then I might expect the cache performance to matter. –  Chris Hopman Apr 21 '11 at 19:25
    
@Chris Hopman: sorry but I don't get your point. The cache contains more than just one array's element –  BlackBear Apr 21 '11 at 19:28
    
@BlackBear: Essentially you always get a cache miss on the first access of an element (ignoring prefetching). Since the loops access each element only once there should be the same cache misses regardless of if its done as one loop or two. –  Chris Hopman Apr 21 '11 at 19:34
    
Another possibility would be that the arrays are still in the cache after the first loop, in which case there would be less/no cache misses in the second/third. –  Chris Hopman Apr 21 '11 at 19:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.