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If I have the following code:

var A = Array[Array[Double]]()    // where A becomes an MxP matrix
var B = Array[Array[Double]]()    // where B becomes an NxP matrix

What are some efficient ways to append one matrix to the other, resulting in a single matrix, as the following pseudocode would suggest?

val C = A append B    // where C is a (M+N)xP matrix

Obviously, one of the dimensions (in this case P) is held constant.

EDIT: So far, both of the provided solutions are growing in the second dimension. I am trying to hold the second dimension fixed.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Functional, but not as performant as the imperative alternative would be:

scala> val a = Array.tabulate(2, 3)((_, _) => (math.random * 100).toInt)
a: Array[Array[Int]] = Array(Array(52, 61, 58), Array(35, 69, 39))

scala> val b = Array.tabulate(2, 4)((_, _) => (math.random * 100).toInt)
b: Array[Array[Int]] = Array(Array(51, 54, 87, 10), Array(52, 76, 18, 85))

scala> (a, b).zipped.map(_ ++ _)
res0: Array[Array[Int]] = Array(Array(52, 61, 58, 51, 54, 87, 10), Array(35, 69, 39, 52, 76, 18, 85))

(In reply to the comment...)

Holding the second dimension fixed:

scala> val x = Array.tabulate(3, 2)((_, _) => (math.random * 100).toInt)
x: Array[Array[Int]] = Array(Array(13, 26), Array(96, 6), Array(68, 58))

scala> val y = Array.tabulate(2, 2)((_, _) => (math.random * 100).toInt)
y: Array[Array[Int]] = Array(Array(82, 5), Array(0, 76))

scala> x ++ y
res1: Array[Array[Int]] = Array(Array(13, 26), Array(96, 6), Array(68, 58), Array(82, 5), Array(0, 76))
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Performance is not much of a concern with this portion of the code. Is it possible to grow it in the other direction? That is, in my posting, I had P held constant (the second dimension) –  Bruce Ferguson Apr 21 '11 at 16:03
    
Thanks, that did the trick. –  Bruce Ferguson Apr 21 '11 at 16:21
1  
The easiest (though not necessarily fastest) way to grow in the other dimension is to first transpose the two input arrays, then transpose the output after concatenation. –  Kevin Wright Apr 21 '11 at 18:27
    
@Kevin Wright. That's a good point. –  Bruce Ferguson Apr 21 '11 at 19:01
    
@Bruce - I do try :) –  Kevin Wright Apr 22 '11 at 12:33
scala> val a = Array.fill(4,3) { 1. };
a: Array[Array[Double]] = Array(Array(1.0, 1.0, 1.0), Array(1.0, 1.0, 1.0), Array(1.0, 1.0, 1.0), Array(1.0, 1.0, 1.0))

scala> val b = Array.fill(4,6) { 2. };         
b: Array[Array[Double]] = Array(Array(2.0, 2.0, 2.0, 2.0, 2.0, 2.0), Array(2.0, 2.0, 2.0, 2.0, 2.0, 2.0), Array(2.0, 2.0, 2.0, 2.0, 2.0, 2.0), Array(2.0, 2.0, 2.0, 2.0, 2.0, 2.0))

scala> for((aa,bb) <- a zip b) yield (aa ++ bb)
res0: Array[Array[Double]] = Array(Array(1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 2.0, 2.0, 2.0, 2.0, 2.0, 2.0), Array(1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 2.0, 2.0, 2.0, 2.0, 2.0, 2.0), Array(1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 2.0, 2.0, 2.0, 2.0, 2.0, 2.0), Array(1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 2.0, 2.0, 2.0, 2.0, 2.0, 2.0))
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Is it possible to grow it in the other direction? That is, in my posting, I had P held constant (the second dimension) –  Bruce Ferguson Apr 21 '11 at 16:04

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