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The following code sorts an array of words, working on small arrays, and segfaulting on large ones (>400000 words, though I haven't found a limit). It is being called by a program that passes it an array of words (read from a file) to be sorted and tests its success:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <math.h>

#include "csort.h"
#include "sort.h"

// array points to array of pointers to strings, count is number of entries in array

void sortC(char** array, unsigned int count){
  array = merge_sort(array, count);
  // testing:
  /*for (int i = 0; i < count; i++){
    printf("%s ", array[i]);
    }*/
}

char** merge_sort(char** array, int count){
  if (count <= 1) return array;
  else {
    int lcount = 0;
    int rcount = 0;
    int middle = count/2;
    lcount = middle;
    char* left[lcount];
    subArray(array, left, 0, middle);
    rcount = count-middle;
    char* right[rcount];
    subArray(array, right, middle, count);
    return merge(merge_sort(left, lcount), merge_sort(right, rcount), array, 0, lcount, rcount);
  }
}

void subArray(char** array, char** subarray, int start, int end){
  int ai; // index in original array
  int si; // index in subarray
  for (ai = start, si = 0; ai < end; ai++, si++){
    subarray[si] = array[ai];
  }
}

char** merge(char** left, char** right, char** output, int oi, int lcount, int rcount){
  if (lcount > 0 && rcount > 0){
    int lmin = findMinimum(left, lcount);
    int rmin = findMinimum(right, rcount);
    if (strcmp(left[lmin], right[rmin]) < 0){
      output[oi] = left[lmin];
      removeFromArray(left, lmin, lcount);
      lcount--;
    }
    else {
      output[oi] = right[rmin];
      removeFromArray(right, rmin, rcount);
      rcount--;
    }
  }
  else if (lcount == 0) {
    if (rcount == 1) {
      output[oi] = right[0];
      return output;
    } else {
      int rmin = findMinimum(right, rcount);
      output[oi] = right[rmin];
      removeFromArray(right, rmin, rcount);
      rcount--;
    }
  }
  else if (rcount == 0) {
    if (lcount == 1) {
      output[oi] = left[0];
      return output;
    } else {
      int lmin = findMinimum(left, lcount);
      output[oi] = left[lmin];
      removeFromArray(left, lmin, lcount);
      lcount--;
    }
  }
  return merge(left, right, output, ++oi, lcount, rcount);
}

int findMinimum(char** array, int count){
  char* minvalue = array[0];
  char* currentvalue = minvalue;
  int minindex = 0;
  for (int i = 1; i < count; i++){
    currentvalue = array[i];
    if (strcmp(currentvalue, minvalue) < 0){
      minvalue = currentvalue;
      minindex = i;
    }
  }
  return minindex;
}

void removeFromArray(char** array, int index, int count){
  // removes specified index from an array
  for (int i = index; i < count; i++){
    if (i+1 == count){
      array[i] = 0; // this entry will be gone when count decrements
    } else {
      array[i] = array[i+1];
    }
  }
}
share|improve this question
    
Is there a specific question here? Have you run it in the debugger to see where it's segfaulting? –  Brian Roach Apr 21 '11 at 17:11
    
(gdb) run Enter File Name: kjvbible.txt 790691 words were read. Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault. 0x08048a1d in merge (left=0xff518910, right=0xff5006e0, output=0xff530bd0, oi=35226, lcount=7036, rcount=7157) at csort.c:48 /home/elijah_houle/cs261/sort/csort.c:48:1185:beg:0x8048a1d –  Elijah Apr 21 '11 at 17:14
    
Why is it segfaulting? A backtrace is not helpful as it just shows "merge()" being called thousands of times. –  Elijah Apr 21 '11 at 17:15
    
The "omly when N is very large" makes this sound like your problem is during memory allocation. Are you sure that everything is working fine to that point, all mallocs returned non null, etc? –  hugomg Apr 21 '11 at 17:26
    
I would suggest recompiling with debugging symbols ( -g ) to find out exactly where you are having a problem. –  Brian Roach Apr 21 '11 at 17:27

2 Answers 2

If there's no bug on your code then the problem might be how you are storing the data. Do you use malloc() to allocate the array to store your data or are you declaring an array that is big enough?

For large data sets you must use malloc(), which will allocate space on the HEAP instead of the stack. The stack has a limited space. This would explain why with smaller data your program works and with bigger data sets it crashes.

Also one very important point is that you are using recursion: merge() calling merge(). Too many recursive calls could lead to a stack overflow (segfault).

share|improve this answer
    
You would think he'd get a Stack Overflow error if that were the case. (Though he might be, and not telling us since the question is fairly short on details.). –  Brian Roach Apr 21 '11 at 17:26
    
Also don't forget to check the error code from malloc. –  Robin Green Apr 21 '11 at 17:31
    
Updated answer. –  karlphillip Apr 21 '11 at 17:35
    
@Robin Green: The return value, you mean. –  unwind Apr 27 '11 at 11:02

Looks like a stack overflow, you are allocating automatic arrays of thousands if items in each invocation, and then recursing.

These lines, to be specific:

char* left[lcount];

and

char* right[rcount];

For the values in your comment, where count == 7157, this would be quite costly in terms of stack space.

Consider either using malloc() for these, or figure out a way to represent a sub-array without requiring new memory.

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