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How to resolve “LINK : fatal error LNK1561: entry point must be defined”?

I have class A and B like this and upon linking there is error: error LNK1561: entry point must be defined. What am I doing wrong?

#include <string>
#include <cstdlib>

class A 
{
public:
A(){}
~A(){}
string getName()
{ return name; }
void setName(string name)
{this->name = name;}
void write()
{
   cout << "Value:" << getName() << endl;
}
protected:
string name;
};

#include <string>
#include "A.h"
class B : public A
{
public:
B()
{
setName("B");
}
~B(){}
};

#include "A.h"
#include "B.h"
#include <cstdlib>

int main()
{
B abc = B();
abc.write();

system("PAUSE");
return 0;
 }

I get following errors:

error C2039: 'name' : is not a member of 'A'
error C2061: syntax error : identifier 'string'
error C2065: 'cout' : undeclared identifier
error C2065: 'endl' : undeclared identifier
error C2065: 'name' : undeclared identifier
error C2146: syntax error : missing ';' before identifier 'getName'
error C2146: syntax error : missing ';' before identifier 'name'
error C2660: 'A::setName' : function does not take 1 arguments
error C4430: missing type specifier - int assumed. Note: C++ does not support default-int

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marked as duplicate by Brian Roach, quamrana, Bo Persson, dmckee, YOU Apr 23 '11 at 16:52

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Welcome to Stack Overflow! Please use the search before asking new questions. Many questions have already been asked and answered, and you may find you solution instantly. –  Brian Roach Apr 21 '11 at 17:56
1  
You are missing this too: using namespace std; –  yasouser Apr 21 '11 at 18:09

5 Answers 5

If that's all there is, there is no int main() defined, so their is no place for the code to be called from and no place to start.

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I will edit my first post with main function, but still I get a lot of errors with it. –  Anajrob Apr 21 '11 at 18:02

You need to declare the entry point of your application, which is usually:

int main()
{
 // code to declare an A and B object
}
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Well, you don't show us the command, but if you're linking to make an executable (rather than a dll), you have to define a function main; that's what the runtime invokes when it starts the executable.

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You've not written main() function.

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You don't appear to have a main method, which is the entry point into your program.

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