Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
How to resolve “LINK : fatal error LNK1561: entry point must be defined”?

I have class A and B like this and upon linking there is error: error LNK1561: entry point must be defined. What am I doing wrong?

#include <string>
#include <cstdlib>

class A 
{
public:
A(){}
~A(){}
string getName()
{ return name; }
void setName(string name)
{this->name = name;}
void write()
{
   cout << "Value:" << getName() << endl;
}
protected:
string name;
};

#include <string>
#include "A.h"
class B : public A
{
public:
B()
{
setName("B");
}
~B(){}
};

#include "A.h"
#include "B.h"
#include <cstdlib>

int main()
{
B abc = B();
abc.write();

system("PAUSE");
return 0;
 }

I get following errors:

error C2039: 'name' : is not a member of 'A'
error C2061: syntax error : identifier 'string'
error C2065: 'cout' : undeclared identifier
error C2065: 'endl' : undeclared identifier
error C2065: 'name' : undeclared identifier
error C2146: syntax error : missing ';' before identifier 'getName'
error C2146: syntax error : missing ';' before identifier 'name'
error C2660: 'A::setName' : function does not take 1 arguments
error C4430: missing type specifier - int assumed. Note: C++ does not support default-int

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Brian Roach, quamrana, Bo Persson, dmckee, YOU Apr 23 '11 at 16:52

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Welcome to Stack Overflow! Please use the search before asking new questions. Many questions have already been asked and answered, and you may find you solution instantly. –  Brian Roach Apr 21 '11 at 17:56
1  
You are missing this too: using namespace std; –  yasouser Apr 21 '11 at 18:09

5 Answers 5

Well, you don't show us the command, but if you're linking to make an executable (rather than a dll), you have to define a function main; that's what the runtime invokes when it starts the executable.

share|improve this answer

You need to declare the entry point of your application, which is usually:

int main()
{
 // code to declare an A and B object
}
share|improve this answer

You don't appear to have a main method, which is the entry point into your program.

share|improve this answer

You've not written main() function.

share|improve this answer

If that's all there is, there is no int main() defined, so their is no place for the code to be called from and no place to start.

share|improve this answer
    
I will edit my first post with main function, but still I get a lot of errors with it. –  Anajrob Apr 21 '11 at 18:02

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.