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Let us assume that we have a simple UI that has only one state variable. This state is expressed as an enum value, eg. Phase1, Phase2 etc. Depending on which state (phase) the UI is, different UI elements, windows supposed to be visible or hidden.

Here is the code:

public enum Phases { Phase1, Phase2, Phase3 }

public class UIStateModel : DependencyObject
{
    public static DependencyProperty CurrentStateProperty =
        DependencyProperty.Register("CurrentStateProperty",
                                    typeof(Phases),
                                    typeof(UIStateModel));
    public Phases CurrentState
    {
        get { return (Phases)GetValue(CurrentStateProperty); }
        set { SetValue(CurrentStateProperty, value); }
    }
    public Visibility Window1Visible // Databound to Window1.Visibility
    {
        get
        {
            if (this.CurrentState == Phases.Phase1) return Visibility.Visible;
            else return Visibility.Hidden;
        }
    }
    public Visibility Window2Visible // Databound to Window2.Visibility
    {
        get
        {
            if (this.CurrentState == Phases.Phase2) return Visibility.Visible;
            else return Visibility.Hidden;
        }
    } 
    ...
}

The problem is that data binding with the code above does not work, because WindowXVisible properties are not DependencyProperty-s. Should I turn all properties to DependencyProperty, then I will introduce redundancy into the state management. Besides the extra burden to keep everything in sync, it can even become inconsistent (if I fail to sync well).

What would be the correct way to avoid introducing redundancy in the UI state management, but still leverage the power of databinding facilitated by DependencyProperty-s?

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Just wondering why you didn't extend an ItemsControl with a DependencyProperty that changes your childrens' Visibility when it is changed? I also posted an alternative method as an answer. – m-y Apr 21 '11 at 18:47
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use INotifyPropertyChanged. Simply send a change notification for the given WindowXVisible when CurrentState changes (DP has a callback for this).

Bindings can generally listen to changes either via DependencyProperty or INotifyPropertyChanged notifications (which must be sent manually though, unlike with DP).

You can use this tool to generate the notification calls automatically (without increasing complexity of your code by a bit). It handles even such nontrivial cases surprisingly well.

EDIT:

Register this into PropertyMetadata of the CurrentStateProperty.

    private static void OnCurrentStateChanged(DependencyObject d, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        this.OnPropertyChanged("CurrentState");
        this.OnPropertyChanged("Window1Visible");
        this.OnPropertyChanged("Window2Visible");
    }

OnPropertyChanged simply invokes PropertyChanged event with this as sender and the string as property name.

This will cause Window1Visible and Window2Visible bindings to update and get the new values.

By the way, you should try to figure out better names than Window1 and WIndow2.

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You should show some code of how to implement this. It's not obvious how based on what you've written. – Gabe Apr 21 '11 at 18:14
    
@Gabe Added code sample. – Matěj Zábský Apr 21 '11 at 18:22

There are several good answers so I won't directly propose a specific solution but I will address the general concern you are facing. You are afraid that adding some dependency property machinery to replicate the seeming simple state matching concepts you already have is potentially redundant or even worse that it might not work correctly.

The truth is that you will be simply reimplementing the same concepts using dependency property infrastructure instead of CLR infrastructure. Yes, it will be a little more verbose, but this is rock-solid stuff that the whole of WPF is based on. For example a ListBox has a SelectedItem and SelectedIndex that it needs to keep in sync, just like in your example. Once you get it right, no matter what you do, they will never get out of sync.

The only time the visiblity can change is when the state changes and so you can set the visibility from the state change callback, as long as you trust that the callback will be called. In fact even without dependency properties, you sometimes see programmers using exactly this strategy to avoid computations in the getter for a property. So think of it not a redundancy but merely a different way to accomplish the same goal.

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You can bind to CurrentState and write an IValueConverter that converts to Visibility.

This question might be useful.

EDIT - Assuming you need a dependency property for databinding purposes. Otherwise, INotifyPropertyChanged is easier.

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While your suggestion definitely works, the use of value converters (especially if done frequently) make the code more difficult to interpret. Implementation of particular concerns get dispersed which is not good. – user256890 Apr 22 '11 at 21:25

Binding does not work for CLR objects. It only works for Dependency Properties. Hence, I would turn WindowXStyle into a read-only dependency property:

using System;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Windows;

namespace MyNamespace
{
    public enum Phases { Phase1, Phase2, Phase3 }

    public class UIStateModel : DependencyObject
    {
        static UIStateModel()
        {
            CurrentStateProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("CurrentState", typeof(Phases), typeof(UIStateModel),
                new FrameworkPropertyMetadata
                {
                    PropertyChangedCallback = new PropertyChangedCallback(OnCurrentStateChanged)
                });

            Window1VisibilityPropertyKey = DependencyProperty.RegisterReadOnly("Window1Visiblity", typeof(Visibility), typeof(UIStateModel),
                new PropertyMetadata());
            Window1VisibilityProperty = Window1VisibilityPropertyKey.DependencyProperty;

            Window2VisibilityPropertyKey = DependencyProperty.RegisterReadOnly("Window2Visiblity", typeof(Visibility), typeof(UIStateModel),
                new PropertyMetadata());
            Window2VisibilityProperty = Window2VisibilityPropertyKey.DependencyProperty;
        }

        public Phases CurrentState
        {
            get { return (Phases)GetValue(CurrentStateProperty); }
            set { SetValue(CurrentStateProperty, value); }
        }

        public static DependencyProperty CurrentStateProperty;

        [DesignerSerializationVisibility(DesignerSerializationVisibility.Hidden)]
        public Visibility Window1Visibility
        {
            get { return (Visibility)GetValue(Window1VisibilityProperty); }
            protected set { SetValue(Window1VisibilityPropertyKey, value); }
        }

        public static readonly DependencyProperty Window1VisibilityProperty;
        private static readonly DependencyPropertyKey Window1VisibilityPropertyKey;

        [DesignerSerializationVisibility(DesignerSerializationVisibility.Hidden)]
        public Visibility Window2Visibility
        {
            get { return (Visibility)GetValue(Window2VisibilityProperty); }
            protected set { SetValue(Window2VisibilityPropertyKey, value); }
        }

        public static readonly DependencyProperty Window2VisibilityProperty;
        private static readonly DependencyPropertyKey Window2VisibilityPropertyKey;


        public Visibility Window1Visible // Databound to Window1.Visibility
        {
            get
            {
                if (this.CurrentState == Phases.Phase1) return Visibility.Visible;
                else return Visibility.Hidden;
            }
        }
        public Visibility Window2Visible // Databound to Window2.Visibility
        {
            get
            {
                if (this.CurrentState == Phases.Phase2) return Visibility.Visible;
                else return Visibility.Hidden;
            }
        }

        private static void OnCurrentPageChanged(DependencyObject obj, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            UIStateModel element = (UIStateModel)obj;

            Phases oldPhase = (Phases)e.OldValue;
            Phases newPhase = (Phases)e.NewValue;

            //Probably want to use Collapsed as apposed to Hidden for UI Measure/Arrange purposes
            switch (oldPhase)
            {
                case Phases.Phase1:
                    element.Window1Visibility = Visibility.Hidden;
                    break;
                case Phases.Phase2:
                    element.Window2Visibility = Visibility.Hidden;
                    break;
                case Phases.Phase3:
                    //element.Window3Visiblity = Visibility.Hidden;
                    break;
                default:
                    //??
                    break;
            }

            switch (newPhase)
            {
                case Phases.Phase1:
                    element.Window1Visibility = Visibility.Visible;
                    break;
                case Phases.Phase2:
                    element.Window2Visibility = Visibility.Visible;
                    break;
                case Phases.Phase3:
                    //element.Window3Visiblity = Visibility.Visible;
                    break;
                default:
                    //??
                    break;
            }
        }

        //...
    }
}

Take note that you'll also probably want to use Visiblity.Collapsed as apposed to Visiblity.Hidden ... Collapsed not only hides the object, but it does not affect the Measurement/Arrangement of other UIElements. Hidden affects the Measurement and Arrangement of other elements, but it doesn't actually draw the element (think of it more along the lines of "Invisible").

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