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I am a happy django developer and now want to build a small python desktop app. I have decided to use wxpython as my gui toolkit.

Now starts the confusion. How should I organize my code? are there any simple starting point schemes? Any pointers to real world code of small wxpython application with database interactions ?

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1  
just start coding...it will become apparent once you get down and dirty –  eat_a_lemon Apr 21 '11 at 18:00
3  
Although its good to make mistakes and learn, its better if you learn from others mistakes ;) –  Myth Apr 21 '11 at 18:06
    
haha interesting thought, but I find that going through it yourself makes you better, but I guess it is a time issue...if you want to save time then I can see that –  eat_a_lemon Apr 21 '11 at 21:01

2 Answers 2

This is my favorite way to get started with a new wxPython project: http://www.oneminutepython.com/

It also starts laying out the code for you in a nice way.

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I stick to the "what I write, that I get" rule. So I usually start with one of those:

1) Using default Frame sizer for panel:

enter image description here

import wx

class MainWindow(wx.Frame):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        wx.Frame.__init__(self, *args, **kwargs)

        self.panel = wx.Panel(self)
        self.button = wx.Button(self.panel, label="Test")

        self.sizer = wx.BoxSizer()
        self.sizer.Add(self.button)

        self.panel.SetSizerAndFit(self.sizer)  
        self.Show()

app = wx.App(False)
win = MainWindow(None)
app.MainLoop()

2) Using default Frame sizer for panel and Border for everything inside:

enter image description here

import wx

class MainWindow(wx.Frame):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        wx.Frame.__init__(self, *args, **kwargs)

        self.panel = wx.Panel(self)
        self.button = wx.Button(self.panel, label="Test")

        self.sizer = wx.BoxSizer()
        self.sizer.Add(self.button)

        self.border = wx.BoxSizer()
        self.border.Add(self.sizer, 1, wx.ALL | wx.EXPAND, 5)

        self.panel.SetSizerAndFit(self.border)  
        self.Show()

app = wx.App(False)
win = MainWindow(None)
app.MainLoop()

3) Using custom Frame sizer for panel, so I can control it, for example call "Fit" and "Layout" on it when needed:

enter image description here

import wx

class MainWindow(wx.Frame):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        wx.Frame.__init__(self, *args, **kwargs)

        self.panel = wx.Panel(self)
        self.button = wx.Button(self.panel, label="Test")

        self.windowSizer = wx.BoxSizer()
        self.windowSizer.Add(self.panel, 1, wx.ALL | wx.EXPAND)

        self.sizer = wx.BoxSizer()
        self.sizer.Add(self.button)

        self.border = wx.BoxSizer()
        self.border.Add(self.sizer, 1, wx.ALL | wx.EXPAND, 5)

        self.panel.SetSizerAndFit(self.border)  
        self.SetSizerAndFit(self.windowSizer)   
        self.Show()

app = wx.App(False)
win1 = MainWindow(None)
app.MainLoop()

That is my starting point. Then I just add other primitive widgets and bind events for them. If I need a new panel, I usually put it in a new module and derive the Panel class. I do the same for special widgets which have to derive from the primitive ones - like drawing panels, OpenGL canvas, special case buttons etc.

It is usually also good idea to have functionality separated from GUI. So I write functionality first the way it does not need GUI.

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