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I wrote the following constructor that gets 2 parameters and if a value (x or y) is negative, it will be initialize into zero.

public Point1 ( int x , int y )
    {
        //if one or more of the point values is <0 , the constructor will state a zero value.
        if (x < 0)  
        {
            _x = 0;
        }
        else 
            _x=x;
        if (y < 0)
        {
            _y = 0;
        }
        else
            _y = y;
    }

I just need it to be minimalism if it can be...

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1  
Wow. I don't think I've ever seen that many answers pop in at once. –  Michael Todd Apr 21 '11 at 18:01
3  
I hope you get enough answers. –  Isaac Truett Apr 21 '11 at 18:01
1  
While the syntax presented in the answers below will undoubtedly be "minimalism" ... why do you care? Nothing you are doing here takes any amount of time what so ever and the way you are doing it is perfectly fine. No matter what syntax you use you're going to need two comparisons and two assignments. –  Brian Roach Apr 21 '11 at 18:02
2  
In my personal opinion, most of the answers given are clearer and more concise than the original code posted. If the performance is comparable, why not use a clearer and more concise syntax? –  Isaac Truett Apr 21 '11 at 18:08

13 Answers 13

up vote 9 down vote accepted
_x = Math.max(x,0);
_y = Math.max(y,0);
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1  
Not to be picky, but you just made it less efficient by branching ;) Though with a static method the compiler might optimize it away. –  Brian Roach Apr 21 '11 at 18:06
6  
I would love to see benchmarks showing that it makes a damn bit of difference in a real world setting. :) Plus, the question was about how to "minimalize if conditions" and my snippet has zero if statements, or conditionals of any kind. But your input is noted, and appreciated. –  Isaac Truett Apr 21 '11 at 18:10
    
I didn't say it would have any measurable difference, but I guarantee you that there is a difference ;) See my answer in the comments to the OP's question - IMO I think it's silly for him to be asking this question in the first place and it reeks of a premature optimization attempt which was actually the point of my initial tongue-and-cheek comment; there's really nothing wrong with if (I'd personally use a ternary, but that's just a style thing). –  Brian Roach Apr 21 '11 at 18:14
2  
If the motivation was performance, I agree that it's an attempt at premature optimization. I didn't see the question that way. I saw it as an attempt to write clearer, more concise code. As someone who spends most of his time reading and dealing with other people's poorly written code, "style things" are important to me. –  Isaac Truett Apr 21 '11 at 18:17
1  
That's a fair point, most definitely. I think I often read things with a slant of "stop that, it doesn't make a difference" as I'm more often talking to developers trying to make things faster (and failing) –  Brian Roach Apr 21 '11 at 18:19
_x = Math.max(0, x);
_y = Math.max(0, x);

or

_x = x < 0 ? 0 : x;
_y = y < 0 ? 0 : y;
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_x = (x<0)?0:x ;
_y = (y<0)?0:y ;
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1  
I'd remove the parenthesise and play around with the spaces. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Apr 21 '11 at 19:03
_x = x < 0 ? 0 : x;
_y = y < 0 ? 0 : y;
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How about...

_x = (x < 0) ? 0 : x;
_y = (y < 0) ? 0 : y;
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This might work for you:

public Point1 (int x, int y)
{
    _x = x < 0 ? 0 : x;
    _y = y < 0 ? 0 : y;
}
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Try:

_x = Math.max(0, x);
_y = Math.max(0, y);
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If you want to use the fewest characters possible, maybe something like:

public Point1(int x, int y) {
    _x = Math.max(0,x);
    _y = Math.max(0,y);
}
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Write a function, NegativeToZero and use that instead:

_x = NegativeToZero(x);
_y = NegativeToZero(y);
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That code is as simple as it gets. If you're looking for cleaner code (and this depends on the developer) I always use ternary operators for simple if-else statements:

_x = (x < 0) ? 0 : x;
_y = (y < 0) ? 0 : y;

That just says that if x < 0, use 0, otherwise use x

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public Point1 ( int x , int y ) { 
  if(x < 0 )  x = 0;
  if( y < 0)  y = 0;

  _x = x;
  _y = y;

}

or

public Point1 ( int x , int y ) { 
 _x = x < 0 ? 0 : x;
 _y = y < 0 ? 0 : y;

}

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What I'd actually prefer:

public Point1(int x, int y) {
    this.x = nonnegative(x);
    this.y = nonnegative(y);
}

where:

public static int nonegative(int value) {
    if (value < 0) {
        throw new IllegalStateException(
            value + " is negative"
        );
    }
    return value;
}

If you hide the constructor and add a static creation method, so much the better (if a little more verbose). Certainly a negative carpet-sweeping creation method shouldn't be munged into a constructor.

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This is just for fun (no conditionals and of course not efficient at all). It does minimize if conditionals though :)

int temp = (x&(~Integer.MAX_VALUE))>>>(Integer.SIZE - 6);      
_x = (x >>> (temp - (temp >> 5))) - (temp >> 5);

Slight improvement:

int temp = (x&(~Integer.MAX_VALUE))>>>(Integer.SIZE - 6);      
_x = (x << (temp - (temp >> 5))) & Integer.MAX_VALUE;
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