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Static method Object.Equals(Object, Object) supports reference equality for reference types, and bitwise equality for value types, where with bitwise equality the objects that are compared have the same binary representation, while value equality objects compared have the same value even though they have different binary representations.

For example, since i1 and b1 are of different types, they don't have the same binary representation and thus Object.Equals(Object, Object) returns false:

        int  i1 = 100;
        byte b1 = 100;
        Console.WriteLine(Object.Equals(i1, b1));//false

Object.Equals(Object, Object) should also return false when comparing d1 and d2 ( since the two variables have different binary representation of the same value ), but it instead returns true, which suggests that it compares them using value equality:

        decimal d1 = 1.10M;
        decimal d2 = 1.100M;
        Console.WriteLine(Object.Equals(d1, d2)); //true

Shouldn't Object.Equals(Object, Object) return False when comparing d1 and d2?

From http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bsc2ak47.aspx:

For example, consider two Decimal objects that represent the numbers 1.10 and 1.1000. The Decimal objects do not have bitwise equality because they have different binary representations to account for the different number of trailing zeroes.

thanx

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Thats a weird bug you have found – Yet Another Geek Apr 21 '11 at 18:31

Decimal is a value type and Equals method actually compares all its fields using Reflection. For more details, please refer to the MSDN:

ValueType.Equals Method

Finally, your scope from the MSDN is incomplete. Here it is:

For example, consider two Decimal objects that represent the numbers 1.10 and 1.1000. The Decimal objects do not have bitwise equality because they have different binary representations to account for the different number of trailing zeroes. However, the objects have value equality because the numbers 1.10 and 1.1000 are considered equal for comparison purposes since the trailing zeroes are insignificant.

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Object.Equals SHOULD implement value (not bitwise) equality.

In the Decimal case, both objects are of the same type and the values are equal, so the result is true.

In the int, byte case, objects are of different type, so the result is false.

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»In the int, byte case, objects are of different type, so the result is false.« Int32.Equals(Object obj) returns true if obj is an instance of Int32 and equals the value of this instance. If obj is of type byte, then it returns False.Doesn't that mean that Int32.Equals(Object) uses bitwise comparison? Else, why would it return false just because obj is of type byte and not int? – user702769 Apr 22 '11 at 2:02
2  
Just about all overrides of Object.Equals(x) return false if x is not of the correct type. Typically the first statement of the method is "if (!(x is typeof(...)) return false;" or some variant. – Richard Schneider Apr 22 '11 at 5:21
    
Any idea why the decision was made that same values but of different types should not be considered as equal? – user702769 Apr 22 '11 at 12:54
    
Because you can't replace a value of one type with the other without something potentially going wrong. Either the type takes a different number of bytes to store in memory, or you could potentially overflow / underflow the new type. – MCattle Nov 26 '12 at 22:34
    
This is the difference between value and reference types. Value types get their values compared. For a reference type, only the references (pointers) are compared. – Richard Schneider Nov 27 '12 at 0:40

You can look at the source of Object.Equals(Object, Object) with a tool like reflector.

Here's the source code of Object.Equals(Object, Object):

public static bool Equals(object objA, object objB)
{
    return ((objA == objB) || (((objA != null) && (objB != null)) && objA.Equals(objB)));
}

Let's examine the clauses:

(objA == objB): This is the object equality operator which checks to see if these two objects reference the same object. This clause is false for our case.

(objA != null) && (objB != null): This is true for our case.

objA.Equals(objB): This is true (it delegates to Decimal.Equals(Object))

We've got all true on the RHS of the || operator, so the whole statement evaluates to true.

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Int32.Equals(Object obj) returns true if obj is an instance of Int32 and equals the value of this instance. If obj is of type byte, then it returns False. Doesn't that mean that Int32.Equals(Object) uses bitwise comparison? Else, why would it return false just because obj is of type byte and not int? – user702769 Apr 22 '11 at 2:02
1  
Likely it checks the types. If obj is not an instance of Int32, it returns false. – ICR Apr 22 '11 at 9:03
    
It does check types. Here's Int32.Equals(object Obj), decompiled: public override bool Equals(object obj) { if (!(obj is int)) return false; else return this == (int) obj; } – MCattle Nov 26 '12 at 22:38

From MSDN:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/w4hkze5k.aspx

Note that a derived type might override the Equals method to implement value equality. Value equality means the compared objects have the same value but different binary representations.

Decimal definitely has an Equals override, as can be seen in the metadata.

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That page is for the static Equals method. – Christopher Harris Apr 21 '11 at 18:35
1  
The static Equals method calls the other one. (whenever both objects exist and are not reference-equal) – Random832 Apr 21 '11 at 20:21
    
As far as I can tell, Int32.Equals,Byte.Equals and Decimal.Equals(Object) don't use value equality?! – user702769 Apr 22 '11 at 2:06

Object.Equals(Object objA, Object objB) first does a quick reference check (objA == objB). If that fails, it tries to call the virtual Object.Equals(Object obj) which Decimal overrides to provide value equality.

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As far as I can tell, Int32.Equals,Byte.Equals and Decimal.Equals(Object) don't use value equality?! – user702769 Apr 22 '11 at 2:07

No way, bitwise equality does not make sense and it is never correct. Whatever is stored in whichever bitwise format, we do not care we care for actual business value.

For business or science purpose 1.10 and 1.100 are same. Bitwise comparison means lexical comparison, which is wrong. "1.10" an "1.100" are different as they represent incorrect lexical sequence.

If you want to compare actual bits then you should use BitConverter.GetBytes which will give you actual bit sequence.

Array.Compare( 
   BitConverter.GetBytes((decimal)1.10),
   BitConverter.GetBytes((decimal)1.100))

I don't know if there is an Array.Compare method or not but you can create one and hope you got the point.

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3  
You should write 1.10m instead of the cast. – svick Apr 21 '11 at 18:48
    
There are many cases where the types' behavior of Equals(Object) doesn't match that of other Equals overloads nor ==. I would suggest that Equals(Object) should represent a stricter form of equality than the others: should be "Should X be considered substitutable for Y". I would posit that since 1.0m and 1.00m behave differently, 1.0m.Equals((Object)1.00m) should be false even though 1.0m.Equals(1.00m) is true, just as 1.0m.Equals((Object)1) is false but 1.0m.Equals(1) is true. – supercat Dec 18 '12 at 23:35

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