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I have a csv file that I am trying to parse in bash. The first field of each line is a time stamp in the format yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm:ss. There are six lines generated every 10 minutes, I added a small sample below.

What I am trying to do is get the first 6 lines from each day. The first entry for each day can happen anytime between 00:00:xx and 00:10:xx so a grep for "00:0" doesn't work.

2010-04-23 00:04:43,0.0,0,4666724,3217665,28866,28866,0.92,65,
2010-04-23 00:04:43,0.1,0,4666724,3217663,20832,20832,0.62,65,
2010-04-23 00:04:43,0.2,0,4666724,3217662,14702,14702,0.46,65,
2010-04-23 00:04:43,0.3,0,4666724,3217664,27739,27739,0.92,65,
2010-04-23 00:04:43,0.4,0,4666724,3217664,25105,25105,0.77,65,
2010-04-23 00:04:43,0.5,0,4666724,3217664,24546,24546,0.77,65,
2010-04-23 00:14:43,0.0,0,4666724,3217665,29226,29226,0.92,65,
2010-04-23 00:14:43,0.1,0,4666724,3217663,21552,21552,0.62,65,
2010-04-23 00:14:43,0.2,0,4666724,3217662,15422,15422,0.46,65,
2010-04-23 00:14:43,0.3,0,4666724,3217664,28459,28459,0.92,65,
2010-04-23 00:14:43,0.4,0,4666724,3217664,25825,25825,0.77,65,
2010-04-23 00:14:43,0.5,0,4666724,3217664,25266,25266,0.77,65,
2010-04-23 00:24:43,0.0,0,4666724,3217665,29586,29586,0.92,65,
2010-04-23 00:24:43,0.1,0,4666724,3217663,22272,22272,0.77,65,
and so on to
2010-04-24 00:05:02,0.0,0,4666724,3217701,71388,71388,2.31,65,
2010-04-24 00:05:02,0.1,0,4666724,3217701,70264,70264,2.31,65,
2010-04-24 00:05:02,0.2,0,4666724,3217700,61254,61254,2.00,65,
2010-04-24 00:05:02,0.3,0,4666724,3217701,71011,71011,2.31,65,
2010-04-24 00:05:02,0.4,0,4666724,3217701,68111,68111,2.15,65,
2010-04-24 00:05:02,0.5,0,4666724,3217702,69904,69904,2.31,65,

Ideas, comments? Bob

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4 Answers 4

It can be as simple as using grep with 2 patterns:

grep -e " 00:0" -e " 00:10" myFIle.csv

1st pattern will match between 00:00 to 00:09 and 2nd pattern will find 00:10.

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This is good but on days when there was an entry at 00:00, it will also pick up the entries at 00:10. Thanks for reminding me about -e –  Jay Apr 21 '11 at 19:41

It should be easy with Perl:

perl -ane '$l = 0 if $F[0] ne $d; print if $l++ < 6; $d = $F[0]' file
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Nice solution... I really do need to learn some perl one day. –  Jay Apr 21 '11 at 19:42

The following uses read with a custom IFS (=Input Field Separator) setting to split the input line into the date-time field, and the rest, then extracts the date from the ISO date-time using bash' substring operator, and then basically goes on printing the next N lines. In the place of the echo, you might want to put whatever processing you're performing on the result, because read + echo don't preserve the input exactly.

function first_n_of_each_day() {
    local N="$1"
    local lastDateTime=""
    local I=0
    while IFS=',' read DATETIME OTHER ; do
        local DATE="${DATETIME:0:10}"
        if [ "$DATE" != "$lastDateTime" ] ; then
            I=0
            lastDateTime="$DATE"
        fi
        if [ $I -lt "$N" ] ; then
            let ++I
            # line matches:
            echo "$DATETIME,$OTHER"
        fi
    done
}
first_n_of_each_day 6 < file.csv
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This is it! My solution started something like this but my brain turned to tapioca in the process.. thanks! –  Jay Apr 21 '11 at 19:42

The awk version of eugene y's answer

awk '
    $1 != date {count = 0; date = $1} 
    ++count <= 6 {print}
' filename
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+1 This is really a simple & clean solution to this problem. –  anubhava Apr 22 '11 at 3:24

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