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This returns 1 (aka TRUE)

SELECT DATE_SUB(NOW(), INTERVAL 24*100 HOUR) = DATE_SUB(NOW(), INTERVAL 100 DAY);

100 days ago, the hour of day does not change. But due to Daylight Savings Time (US), 100 twenty-four hour periods ago is actually one hour earlier than if you counted by days. If the above statement accounted for DST, it would return 0 or FALSE.

Is there a way I can say to account for DST for a given statement or session? I would prefer not to use UNIX_TIMESTAMP since it cuts off anything past 2038.

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1  
This might helpful stackoverflow.com/questions/1646171/… (unlikely has a cure in mysql) – ajreal Sep 7 '11 at 13:24
    
Boy! Do I wish I could write a custom data type that works properly! – George Bailey Sep 7 '11 at 14:19
    
You'll have to write you own DATE_SUB function that takes DST into account. BTW I would love to strangle whoever dreamed up that DST nightmare. – Johan Sep 7 '11 at 15:12
    
Can't wait for 64bit unix timestamps to become the normal. y293billionK just won't be a problem... – Marc B Sep 7 '11 at 15:24
up vote -2 down vote accepted

How would cutting off anything past 2038 be a real problem when you can be sure that 64bit integer timestamps will be immplemented everywhere 20 years before that at least ?

Seriously, there are so many issues with the datetime / timestamp types in MySQL that you should try and avoid them when possible.

Do you store many dates beyond 2038 ?

And, why not try using PostgreSQL which has much more advanced type support ?

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Limiting to 2038 adds slight complexity. For example, repeating events on a calendar. Obviously 2038 is not a real problem, but I like to do things the right way, if there is a right way. Regarding the 4th paragraph, we are already on MySQL, I don't think that there is much reason to make such a major shift. – George Bailey Sep 23 '11 at 18:36
    

You'll need to create a custom function, something like this.

DELIMITER $$

CREATE FUNCTION DST(ADatetime DATETIME) RETURNS DATETIME
BEGIN
  DECLARE result DATETIME;
  SET Result = ADatetime;
  IF ADatetime >= startDST AND ADateTime <= endDST THEN 
    result = DATE_SUB(ADatetime, INTERVAL 1 HOUR);
  END IF;
  RETURN result;
END $$

DELIMITER ;
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