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I'm trying to implement the Ford-Fulkerson algorithm to compute the maximum flow in a flow network.

One step of the algorithm is to find a path from the start node to the end node (also know as sink) with available capacity on all edges.

Could you suggest a easy and understandable way to find the augmenting path?

UPDATE #1:

My BFS function:

template <class T>
vector<Vertex<T> *> Graph<T>::bfs(T source) const {
    vector<Vertex<T> *> path;
    queue<Vertex<T> *> q;
    Vertex<T> * v = getVertex(source);
    q.push(v);
    v->visited = true;
    while (!q.empty()) {
        Vertex<T> *v1 = q.front();
        q.pop();
        path.push_back(v1);
        typename vector<Edge<T> >::iterator it = v1->adj.begin();
        typename vector<Edge<T> >::iterator ite = v1->adj.end();
        for (; it!=ite; it++) {
            Vertex<T> *d = it->dest;
            if (d->visited == false) {
                d->visited = true;
                q.push(d);
            }
        }
    }

    return path;
}

It's wrong/incomplete since it's returning wrong results. I think I'm forgeting something.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Read here. Basically use Breadth-first_search.

Edit: path.push_back(v1); is at the wrong place. You will add all vertices of the graph to the path. The correct way is to store for each node which is the predecessor node. This way you can restore the found path. Also you can break the while clause when you reach the sink.

if (d->visited == false) {
    d->visited = true;
    q.push(d);
    predecessor[d] = v1;
}
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I was already trying to use the BFS algorithm. See my updated question, please. –  Renato Rodrigues Apr 21 '11 at 19:23
    
@Renato - See my edit:) –  Petar Minchev Apr 21 '11 at 19:48

It is a bit difficult to give you clear advice without knowing the underlying data structures. Usually when you deal with flows, you have a digraph. I will assume this for my answer. Now I see a few major problems and one minor remark:

template <class T>
vector<Vertex<T> *> Graph<T>::bfs(T source) const {
    vector<Vertex<T> *> path;   

A list might in this case be a better option, as vectors have only amortized constant insertion and removal time, while lists do really constant. (Assuming you are referring to the STL-Containers) - this was the minor remark ;)

    queue<Vertex<T> *> q;

For BFS, you have two options: Either you save all paths, or you save the predecessor for each vertex once you visit it. You just save the vertices you have to visit. This way I do not see how you will be able to reconstruct a full path once you reach the sink.

    Vertex<T> * v = getVertex(source);
    q.push(v);
    v->visited = true;

Initialization seems fine to me.

    while (!q.empty()) {
        Vertex<T> *v1 = q.front();
        q.pop();
        path.push_back(v1);
        typename vector<Edge<T> >::iterator it = v1->adj.begin();
        typename vector<Edge<T> >::iterator ite = v1->adj.end();

Here you take the adjacency list of the vertex you currently are at. Remember, though, that augmenting paths are called augmenting because you can traverse an edge either forward (if there is capacity left, thus the current flow over this edge is less than the capacity of the edge) or backward (if the current flow over this edge is greater 0). You are just taking all edges that go forward in the graph and visit them. This is "normal" BFS, not BFS adapted to the differing graph structure used in max-flow-problems.

(For completeness: You could take your network together with the current flow and create a new graph from this (I know this one as auxiliary network) which is representing exactly this structure. In this case your BFS would work fine. If you are doing this right now, I would like to see the routine computing the auxiliary network).

        for (; it!=ite; it++) {
            Vertex<T> *d = it->dest;
            if (d->visited == false) {
                d->visited = true;
                q.push(d);
            }
        }
    }

That part looks fine for me, except the points I already mentioned. So - save predecessors, check whether a path is helpful for the max flow (has capacity left) and also check backward arcs.

    return path;

Have another look at what you are collecting in your path variable. You actually save all vertices BFS visits in there in the order they are visited. However, you want a subset of these vertices that give the correct path.

Last remark: For Ford-Fulkerson, it might be a clever idea to compute the value you can increment the flow with on the current path directly while doing BFS. This way you do not need to visit the edges once again. Of course, you could do this while collecting the path using the not yet saved predecessors.

I will not give you a complete working code sample, as I assume this is homework and you are supposed to learn something rather than get finished code.

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Have a look at source code: here it is http://aduni.org/courses/algorithms/courseware/handouts/Reciation_09.html

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You shouldn't provide solutions to homework questions. It would be beneficial to the OP if they came up with their own. –  Marlon Apr 21 '11 at 19:15

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