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How do I build a copy constructor that receive another point (x,y) and copy its values ?

I decide a signature: public Point1 (Point1 other) , but I don't know what to write in it...

The Point class looks like:

public class Point1

{
    private int _x ,  _y;    
    public Point1 (Point1 other)
    {
        ...
        ...
    }
//other more constructors here...

}

I tried:

public Point1 (Point1 other)
{
    _x = other._x ;
    _y = other._y;
}

But I almost sure I can do it better..

thnx

share|improve this question
2  
A Point is an example of something that often should be immutable, in which case actually copying one wouldn't be necessary. –  ColinD Apr 21 '11 at 20:07
1  
Why do you think it should be some other way? All a copy constructor is supposed to do is copy the values of the other object's fields. –  uckelman Apr 21 '11 at 20:08
1  
@Edwin: I'm not saying that immutability implies anything about uniqueness of instances, just that there's no point in creating a copy of an immutable object. What good does intentionally creating 2 distinct objects for "a" do? –  ColinD Apr 21 '11 at 20:40
2  
@Edwin: I think you still aren't understanding me. I'm not saying that Strings must always be interned (or something like it) because having two distinct Strings with the same contents is bad. It's not. I'm saying that if you already have a String, deliberately creating another String object with the same contents (using the copy constructor) is pointless. Reading another String with the same contents from a byte[] or whatever is fine. –  ColinD Apr 21 '11 at 21:02
1  
@Edwin I'd argue that String should not have the String(String) constructor for the same reasons that ColinD has pointed out. –  Steve Kuo Apr 22 '11 at 3:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Nope, your attempt of

public Point1(Point1 other)
{
    _x = other._x ;
    _y = other._y;
}

is absolutely fine... (I've corrected the parameter type.)

I'd be tempted to make _x and _y final, and make the class final, but that's because I like immutable types. Others definitely have different opinions :)

Cloning on an inheritance hierarchy is slightly trickier - each class in the hierarchy has to have a relevant constructor, pass whatever argument it's given to the superclass constructor, and then copy just its own fields. For example:

public class Point2 extends Point1    
{
    private int _z;
    public Point2(Point2 other)
    {
        super(other);
        this._z = other._z;
    }
}

That's not too bad on the implementation side, but if you want to faithfully clone a Point2 you need to know it's a Point2 in order to call the right constructor.

Implementing Cloneable allows this to be done a bit more simply, but there are other things to consider around that... basically cloning objects isn't as simple as it might appear :) (I'm sure there's an entry in Effective Java for it. If you don't have a copy, buy one now.)

share|improve this answer
    
Agreed. What else could you do? –  gamernb Apr 21 '11 at 20:07
    
Great answer, and I'm sure effective java recommends copy constructors instead of cloning. I'd also suggest getting rid of the unnecessary "_" chars in the variable names, but that's, like, and opinion man –  Java Drinker Apr 21 '11 at 20:20
    
@Java: Yes, I don't like the _ myself either, but I thought I wouldn't try to change the OP's style too much :) –  Jon Skeet Apr 21 '11 at 20:31
    
Thank you for your very good explanation, but I haven't understood completely the meaning of 'super()'....? –  Master C Apr 21 '11 at 21:28
    
@Master C: It invokes a constructor in a superclass. –  Jon Skeet Apr 21 '11 at 21:41

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