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I'm porting a piece of code from PHP to c/objective-c, and I'm running into trouble handling this two dimensional array.

$PATTERN_LOOKUP = array(
    array(),
    array(6, 18),
    array(6, 22, 38),
    array(6, 26, 46, 66),
    array(6, 28, 50, 72, 94)
);

This is the closest I've gotten (it compiles), however I'm thinking I'll run into trouble later, because this is actually a 5x5 array, and there will be a bunch of undefined numbers. Is there a way to make an asymmetrical multidimensional array in c?

static int PATTERN_LOOKUP[][5] = {
    {0},
    {6, 18},
    {6, 22, 38},
    {6, 26, 46, 66},
    {6, 28, 50, 72, 94}
};
share|improve this question
    
symmetric is the wrong term. Symmetric is used for a square matrix that is its own transpose. The correct term here is ragged. –  David Heffernan Apr 22 '11 at 8:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well, you can always make a "symmetrical" array in C (i.e. a rectangular array) and only use an "asymmetrical" portion of it. This is a perfectly good solution for small arrays. And this is actually exactly what your declaration of PATTERN_LOOKUP does (the elements not explicitly initialized will be implicitly initialized with zeros).

However, for larger arrays it might get too expensive in therms of wasted memory. If it does get too expensive, you can always use a "simulated" 2D array in C (an array of pointers to subarrays)

static int array0[] = { 0 };
static int array1[] = { 6, 18 };
static int array2[] = { 6, 22, 38 };
static int array3[] = { 6, 26, 46, 66 };
static int array4[] = { 6, 28, 50, 72, 94 };

static int *const PATTERN_LOOKUP[] = {
  array0,
  array1,
  array2,
  array3,
  array4
};

You can even use a NULL entry in PATTERN_LOOKUP array to represent an empty array

static int *const PATTERN_LOOKUP[] = {
  NULL,
  array1,
  array2,
  array3,
  array4
};

In C99 you can use compound literals to achieve the same result without separate subarray declarations

static int *const PATTERN_LOOKUP[] = {
  (int []) { 0 },
  (int []) { 6, 18 },
  (int []) { 6, 22, 38 },
  (int []) { 6, 26, 46, 66 },
  (int []) { 6, 28, 50, 72, 94 }
};

Of course, it remains your responsibility to store/remember the actual size of each individual subarray.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a fantastic answer, thanks very much for all the detail! –  Kenny Winker Apr 21 '11 at 22:52
    
Don't forget that in C99 you can use sizeof and variable length arrays for a very effective solution to this. –  dawg Apr 22 '11 at 4:17
    
@drewk could you elaborate? that sounds like something I want! –  Kenny Winker Apr 25 '11 at 22:51
    
@Kenny Winker: This answer covers it mostly, but under C99 both arrays and the sizeof those arrays can be used dynamically. You could allocate dynamically the size of each row in your X x X array. Under C, sizeof is determined at compile time. Under C99, you can do n=24; int array[n]; size=sizeof(array); size is then n * sizeof(int) It is a great, but potentially evil shortcut. Works great as long as you have enough stack, but most implementations do not check for stack overflow. So it is an effective stack based shortcut of the usual malloc / free heap version –  dawg Apr 26 '11 at 1:25

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