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I have the following function that opens jQuery UI's dialog warning about the delete of an entry. Everything works fine, except the POST with AJAX. I get response on "success" but I don't believe I am hitting the .php page that is supposed to execute the query. Am I missing anything here?

var $dialog = $("#dialog").dialog({ autoOpen: false, resizable: false, modal: true });

    $(".delProj").click(function(){ 
        var delURL = $(this).attr("href").split("#");
        var projID = delURL[1];
        $dialog.dialog("open");
        $("#dialog").dialog({
            buttons: {
                "Yes, delete this test": function() {
                    $.ajax({
                        type: "POST",
                        url: "http://www.mydomain.com/inc/db_actions.php",
                        data: "op=DeleteProject&delete="+projID,
                        success: function(){
                          //  alert( "Test Project deleted successfully." );
                          $("#"+projID).remove();
                        }
                    });
                    $(this).dialog("close");
                },
                "No, keep it.": function() {
                    $(this).dialog("close");
                }
            }
        });
    });
share|improve this question
    
Why dont you believe it's not posting to the page? You could always echo from the php script. You could also use firebug to check the post and response back. –  Matt Apr 22 '11 at 1:14
    
Looking at the URL option of your ajax request, are you sure hitting the php page on the same domain from where the page is getting loaded? If not the cross domain policy will fail your ajax call. –  Chandu Apr 22 '11 at 1:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Make your php page called echo something

PHP

echo 'hello world';

Javascript

Add the return value of the callback (here data), and try to show it with js.

[..]

success: function(data){
    alert(data);
}

[...]

share|improve this answer
    
Yep, no need for any complicated tests. This will do just fine, and will minimize a chance of any extraneous errors occurring. –  BraedenP Apr 22 '11 at 1:18
    
This is exactly what I was looking for. Thanks. –  santa Apr 22 '11 at 20:22

I'll usually send some form of a response through JSON-formatted data so that my AJAX queries know whether or not they've accomplished what they've set out to do. Something like:

Script:

$.ajax({
    type: "POST",
    url: "http://www.mydomain.com/inc/db_actions.php",
    data: "op=DeleteProject&delete="+projID,
    success: function(data){
        if(data.success == true)
        {
            $("#"+projID).remove();
        }
});

PHP:

// do something
echo json_encode(array('success'=>true));

Edit:

It's also usually a good thing to trap your ajax errors:

$.ajax({
    type: "POST",
    url: "http://www.mydomain.com/inc/db_actions.php",
    data: "op=DeleteProject&delete="+projID,
    success: function(data){
        if(data.success == true)
        {
            $("#"+projID).remove();
        }
    },
    error: function(){
        alert('something bad happened');
    }
});
share|improve this answer
    
and if you're going to go to that much trouble it's worth pointing out that you really want to get the error parameters from jQuery and not discard them ;) –  jcolebrand Apr 22 '11 at 1:26
    
@drachenstern: absolutely - but then you'd want to get into another discussion about setting correct headers for 500 errors, etc, but that's another discussion ;) –  Demian Brecht Apr 22 '11 at 1:42

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