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Given a list,

(define ll '(a a a b c c c d e e e e))

I want to remove all non-duplicate elements and leave only one copy of the duplicate one, i.e. after removing, the result would be

(a c e)

My algorithm is:

  • Traverse through the list, comparing current element with next element.

    • If they're equal, then cons the current element with the list of the next recursive call. For example,

      (a a a b c)
      

      Move from left to right, encounter a and a.

      (cons a (remove-nondup (cddr lst)))
      
    • Otherwise, skip current and next element.

      (remove-nondup (cddr lst))
      

The problem I'm having is

(define (remove-nondup lst)
  (if (>= (length lst) 2)
      (if (eq? (car lst) (cadr lst))
          (cons (car lst) (remove-nondup (cdr lst)))
          (remove-nondup (cddr lst)))
      lst))

The problem that I'm having is if there are more than 3 consecutive elements, I have no way to keep track of the previous-previous one. So I wonder should I use another procedure to remove all duplicates? or I can just put them into one procedure?

So my alternative current solution was,

(define (remove-dup lst)
  (if (>= (length lst) 2)
      (if (eq? (car lst) (cadr lst))
          (cons (car lst) (remove-dup (cddr lst)))
          (cons (car lst) (remove-dup (cdr lst))))
      lst))

(define (remove-nondup-helper lst)
  (if (>= (length lst) 2)
      (if (eq? (car lst) (cadr lst))
          (cons (car lst) (remove-nondup-helper (cdr lst)))
          (remove-nondup (cddr lst)))
      lst))

; call the helper function and remove-dup
(define (remove-nondup lst)
  (remove-dup (remove-nondup-helper lst)))
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's my solution: first, grab bagify (any version will do). Then:

(define (remove-singletons lst)
  (define (singleton? ass)
    (< (cdr ass) 2))
  (map car (remove singleton? (bagify lst))))

remove is from SRFI 1. If you're using Racket, run (require srfi/1) first. Or, use this simple definition:

(define remove #f)   ; Only needed in Racket's REPL
(define (remove pred lst)
  (cond ((null? lst) lst)
        ((pred (car lst)) (remove pred (cdr lst)))
        (else (cons (car lst) (remove pred (cdr lst))))))
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Could you give a solution without predefined libraries? I'm trying to be familiar with Scheme first before attempting to use the library functions. Thanks. –  Chan Apr 22 '11 at 2:24
    
@Chan: I've added a definition of remove. I can't avoid using it without making the function suck, so that's the next best thing. –  Chris Jester-Young Apr 22 '11 at 2:32
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Here's a way that uses only standard library functions and only tail calls, though it performs linear searches to see if an item has already been seen or put in the result:

(define remove-nondup
  (λ (ls)
    (reverse
      (let loop ([ls ls] [found '()] [acc '()])
        (cond
          [(null? ls)
            acc]
          [(memq (car ls) found)
            (loop (cdr ls)
                  found
                  (if (memq (car ls) acc)
                      acc
                      (cons (car ls) acc)))]
          [else
            (loop (cdr ls)
                  (cons (car ls) found)
                  acc)])))))

(remove-nondup '(a a a b c c c d e e e e)) =>
  (a c e)
(remove-nondup '(a a a b c c c d e e e e f a a f)) =>
  (a c e f)

The loop is a "named let": a handy way to stick a helper procedure inside a procedure without a lot of syntactic clutter.

If you only want to shrink consecutive duplicates down to one item, and remove items only when they don't occur twice consecutively, then here's a way to "remember" the item two cells ago without searching for it, and using only tail calls:

(define remove-nonconsecdup
  (λ (ls)
    (reverse
      (letrec (
          [got1 (λ (ls prev acc)
                  (cond
                    [(null? ls)
                      acc]
                    [(eq? prev (car ls))
                      (got2 (cdr ls) (cons prev acc))]
                    [else
                      (got1 (cdr ls) (car ls) acc)]))]
          [got2 (λ (ls acc)
                  (cond
                    [(null? ls)
                      acc]
                    [(eq? (car acc) (car ls))
                      (got2 (cdr ls) acc)]
                    [else
                      (got1 (cdr ls) (car ls) acc)]))])
        (if (null? ls)
            '()
            (got1 (cdr ls) (car ls) '()))))))

(remove-nonconsecdup '(a a a b c c c d e e e e)) =>
  (a c e)
(remove-nonconsecdup '(a a a b c c c d e e e e f a a f)) =>
  (a c e a)

I don't like reversing lists, but calling reverse is easy. If the extra cons'ing done by reverse is a problem, you could do non-tail calls or stick the items at the end of the list, but that's harder to do efficiently (but easy with a non-standard library macro).

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