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I am attempting to reverse a string without using the reverse function, classes and arrays. However I am trying to do it with regular expressions. I use Programmers Notepad to write programs. When I run the below given code, it is not displaying any result. I am trying to insert a period(.) in the seventh or eighth position on each loop to fetch the next character in reverse order.

s = "This is to test reverse of a string"
len = s.length
for j in len..1 do
    mycommand = "s.scan(/.$/) {|x| puts x}"
    mycommand = mycommand.insert 7,"."
end
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What is your question? –  sawa Apr 22 '11 at 5:20
    
Question is that why it is not giving the output. Probably u have not seen that I wrote: "It is not displaying any result". –  RKh Apr 22 '11 at 5:23
    
I've seen that. It does not have any method that outputs. –  sawa Apr 22 '11 at 5:24
    
mycommand holds the same. –  RKh Apr 22 '11 at 5:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

well, it's not absolutely clear what you're trying to do, but here're some points:

since you declare 'mycommand' variable in a loop(block) - it will be only visible in block. Meaning, you won't be able to use it anywhere else. And as it is now - "mycommand" variable will be created on every iteration

here: for j in len..1 do your 'len' variable (35) is more then 1. Iteration won't happen, you should use it like for j in 1..len do

here:

mycommand = "s.scan(/.$/) {|x| puts x}"

you declare mycommand as a string( just a set of characters ) so, when you then state:

mycommand = mycommand.insert 7,"."

ruby will just transform your string as follows: "s.scan(./.$/) {|x| puts x}"

The concept isn't absolutely clear, but I think what you're trying to do is:

s = "This is to test reverse of a string"
len = s.length
mycommand = "s.scan(/.$/) {|x| print x}" # This does not execute a command, you just create a string
for j in len..1 do
  eval mycommand # Now this executes your command. Take a time and google for "ruby eval"
  s.chop! # This removes last character from your string. e.g 'hello'.chop! #=> 'hell'  
end
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You can't use downto for. There is downto method for this job. I don't exactly understand what you want from this line mycommand = mycommand.insert 7,"." but it reverses string too:

s = "This is to test reverse of a string"
len = s.length
len.downto(1) do |j|
  s.scan(/.$/) {|x| puts x}
  s.chop!
end
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Actually mycommand holds the complete syntax to display the desired character from reverse. I am not following why it didn't work. What if I use: len.step(len,1), will it work? What is the use of Chop? –  RKh Apr 22 '11 at 5:32
    
chop it's for deleting the last character. And no, len.step(len,1) won't work. –  Vasiliy Ermolovich Apr 22 '11 at 5:38
    
Isn't it an overhead to keep deleting the last character? I also want to display the result in one horizontal line and not vertical. –  RKh Apr 22 '11 at 5:45
    
Maybe it's an overhead but you always can use reverse method :) It's one of the thousand methods you can reverse a string I guess. And if you want vertical output use print instead of puts –  Vasiliy Ermolovich Apr 22 '11 at 6:02
s="abc"
(s.size-1).downto(0).map{|x|s[x]}.join
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Great! It works. But it shows result only in irb and not in Programmers Notepad. –  RKh Apr 22 '11 at 5:47
    
I am also looking for the overhead issue. Insignificant but just for fun. I guess, here we have to keep joining. –  RKh Apr 22 '11 at 5:50
    
Then the problem lies with how you configure Programmer's Notepad, not with Ruby. Not sure about overhead, but you could certainly do a benchmark. As for "keep joining", there is only 1 join command. –  kurumi Apr 22 '11 at 6:03

The following 1 liner will do the trick:

> "test reverse of a string".scan(/./).inject([]) {|n,v| n.unshift v}.join
  => "gnirts a fo esrever tset" 

or more succinctly:

> "test reverse of a string".scan(/./).inject("") {|n,v| n = v + n}
 => "gnirts a fo esrever tset" 

This reverses the string based on your requirements.

I didn't grok the last part of your question about inserting between the 7th and 8th positions so I didn't attempt to answer that part.

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Actually I am inserting a . each time in a loop. This is done to keep fetching the character from the end. –  RKh Apr 22 '11 at 10:56

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