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Now Im writing a universal method for loading configuration data from XML. A lot of parameters in my case are stored in node attributes, so I decided to write a universal method for attribute reading:

    private static T ReadAttribute<T>(XElement Element,string AttributeName)
    {
        var attrib = Element.Attribute(AttributeName);

        if (attrib != null)
        {
            return attrib.Value; // off cource error is in this line !
        }
        else
        {
            return default(T);
        }
    }

This method should try to read attribute with specified name and if this attribute missed it should return default value for attribute type. Attribute type is specified by T. As it shown in comment above my problem is that I cant universally convert string value into specific type. Actually I plan use int, double and two enum types as T.
What way I should act in this situation? How I should convert string value into T type?
Thanks in advance!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can use the Convert.ChangeType. It does basically what you want. But it's a conversion not a cast, well, not just a cast.

return (T)Convert.ChangeType(attrib.Value, typeof(T), CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);

The reason why you can simply cast a string to some arbitrary type is that the type system doesn't allow that. However Convert.ChangeType returns object which could be any type and therefore the cast is allowed.

The CultureInfo.InvariantCulture is important becuase XML content isn't shouldn't be encoded/decoded using different cultures. The XmlConvert class should be used if working with XML however it doesn't have a handy generic method like XmlConvert.ChangeType.

The XAttribute class has many explicit user-defined casts that map to the XmlConvert class. However, you cannot simply use these with a unconstrained type parameter T and expect the same result.

To make matters worse, XML and Convert doesn't actually play nice. So if you're really serious about this you would write something like this to handle the conversions.

static T ConvertTo<T>(XAttribute attr)
{
    object value;
    switch (Type.GetTypeCode(typeof(T)))
    {
        case TypeCode.Boolean: value = XmlConvert.ToBoolean(attr.Value); break;
        case TypeCode.Int32: value = XmlConvert.ToInt32(attr.Value); break;
        case TypeCode.DateTime: value = XmlConvert.ToDateTime(attr.Value); break;
        // Add support for additional TypeCode values here... 
        default:
            throw new ArgumentException(string.Format("Unsupported destination type '{0}'.", typeof(T)));
    }
    return (T)value;
}
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For those wondering, Convert.ChangeType requires the source object to implement IConvertible (unless the source already is the required type). –  Simon Svensson Apr 22 '11 at 8:36
    
Is there a danger with this that the forward conversion has been done by XAttribute (with methods from XmlConvert), but that the reverse conversion will be done with Convert? I don't know if there are corner-cases on, for example, DateTime, where the conversion might be different? –  Will Dean Apr 22 '11 at 8:47
    
Yes! It works perfectly for now. Thank you! But how can I be sure that, for example, I cant use my method with hypothetical classA, for which dint exists conversion from string. As I understand its not right to simply specify where T: IConvertible it wouldnt yield sufficient results –  Anton Semenov Apr 22 '11 at 8:48
    
@Will Dean - Yes there is. Using Convert.ChangeType will work in most cases however there are specific things being done by the XmlConvert class that isn't being done by the Convert class. It would be better to roll your own ConvertTo<T> which works properly with XML content. –  John Leidegren Apr 22 '11 at 8:50
    
@Anton Semenov You really can't, it's gonna throw a runtime exception if it's not possible. The up side of this is that it's a pretty neat syntax but it does have its pitfalls. –  John Leidegren Apr 22 '11 at 8:52

I would go with the TypeConverter stuff. It's basically a class that does conversions to/from values and cultures. The primary difference between a TypeConverter and Convert.ChangeType is that the later requires the IConvertible interface on the source type, while TypeConverters can work with any objects.

I've created a helper class for this, since I often store different configuration objects in xml-files. That's also why it's hardcoded to convert to/from CultureInfo.InvariantCulture.

public static class TypeConversion {
    public static Object Convert(Object source, Type targetType) {
        var sourceType = source.GetType();
        if (targetType.IsAssignableFrom(sourceType))
            return source;

        var sourceConverter = TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(source);
        if (sourceConverter.CanConvertTo(targetType))
            return sourceConverter.ConvertTo(null, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, source, targetType);

        var targetConverter = TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(targetType);
        if (targetConverter.CanConvertFrom(sourceType))
            return targetConverter.ConvertFrom(null, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, source);

        throw new ArgumentException("Neither the source nor the target has a TypeConverter that supports the requested conversion.");
    }


    public static TTarget Convert<TTarget>(object source) {
        return (TTarget)Convert(source, typeof(TTarget));
    }
}

It's fully possible to create your own TypeConverter to handle system types, like System.Version (which doesnt implement IConvertible) to support conversions like from strings containing a version number ("a.b.c.d") to an actual Version object.

public class VersionTypeConverter : TypeConverter {
    public override bool CanConvertFrom(ITypeDescriptorContext context, Type sourceType) {
        if (sourceType == typeof(string))
            return true;

        return base.CanConvertFrom(context, sourceType);
    }

    public override object ConvertFrom(ITypeDescriptorContext context, CultureInfo culture, object value) {
        var s = value as string;
        if (s != null)
            return new Version(s);

        return base.ConvertFrom(context, culture, value);
    }

    public override bool CanConvertTo(ITypeDescriptorContext context, Type destinationType) {
        if (destinationType == typeof(string))
            return true;

        return base.CanConvertTo(context, destinationType);
    }

    public override object ConvertTo(ITypeDescriptorContext context, CultureInfo culture, object value, Type destinationType) {
        var v = value as Version;
        if (v != null && destinationType == typeof(string)) {
            return v.ToString();
        }

        return base.ConvertTo(context, culture, value, destinationType);
    }
}

To actually use this provider you need to registered it during application startup, using TypeDescriptor.AddProvider, passing in a custom TypeDescriptionProvider, and typeof(Version). This needs to return a custom CustomTypeDescriptor in the TypeDescriptorProvider.GetTypeDescriptor method, and the descriptor needs to override GetConverter to return a new instance of VersionTypeConverter. Easy. ;)

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Wow! It really powerful solution. Now Im trying to use it in my programm. Thank you! –  Anton Semenov Apr 22 '11 at 9:02
    
I believe that all system types implementing IConvertible also has a TypeConverter already. The main reason why it's so much code needed is that the TypeDescriptor stuff wraps the whole reflection framework. Override CustomTypeDescriptor.GetProperties to add/remove properties, and people using TypeDescriptor.GetProperties will see new stuff. You can make up your own properties and handle their storage on your own if you want. –  Simon Svensson Apr 22 '11 at 9:08

Built-in methods won't help if T is a type defined by yourself. Let's say the xml looks like:

//some other segments
<Book Name="Good book" Price="20" Author="Jack" />

And you T is the class Book that looks like:

class Book
{
   public string Name { get; set; }
   public decimal Price { get; set; }
   public string Author { get; set; }
     //maybe some other properties
}

There is no magic to convert the XElement to an instance of Book automatically, you need to implement it yourself. An easy and general implementation is something like this:

    interface IXElementConvertible
    {
        void LoadFrom(XElement element);
    }

    class Book : IXElementConvertible
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public decimal Price { get; set; }
        public string Author { get; set; }

        public void LoadFrom(XElement element)
        {
            this.Name = element.Attribute("Name").Value;
            //blabla
        }
    }

And you need to modify your method:

private static T ReadAttribute<T>(XElement Element,string AttributeName) 
                             where T : IXElementConvertible, new()
{
    T t = new T();
    t.LoadFrom(element);
       //just an example here, not the complete implementation
}
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I think you should do the following check in you code:

if (attrib.Value is T)
{
...
}
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Thanks for negative vote when trying to help!!! –  Dummy01 Apr 22 '11 at 8:39
1  
It work's like this @Dummy01. If you're wrong, you'll get a down vote because we don't want to promote wrong answers. However, if you're sincere and wan't to learn more I'd happly help you with that. Your suggestion actually disregards the rules of the type system entierly and it doesn't make any sense. The Value property is of type System.String it will never type test against T if T isn't a string. Which I don't see the point of doing, it doesn't solve the problem and it's clear to me, that you didn't understand the question. –  John Leidegren Apr 22 '11 at 8:47
    
You spent too many lines to make the teacher to me. I guess it fits perfect to the direct negative voting of yours. But for the story, yes you are right. I was wrongly remembering that Value is an object, and not a string, and that is where my check was coming from. In fact if you noticed what I just said I did wrong, is the easiest solution to your problem, and in that you will also use my check. But I don't risk another bad vote from the teacher so I guess you have to figure it out by yourself :) –  Dummy01 Apr 22 '11 at 9:08
    
I wasn't the one to down vote your answer. –  John Leidegren Apr 22 '11 at 10:01
    
for clarity, I also did not down vote on you –  Anton Semenov Apr 22 '11 at 11:29

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