Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
Floating Point Limitations

Hi there,

maybe this has a very simple answer. I was playing around with the Python interpreter.

>>> 1
1
>>> 1.1
1.1000000000000001
>>> 1.2
1.2

Why 1.1 was interpreted as 1.1000000000000001?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by S.Lott, Piskvor, DTing, bgporter, Denis Otkidach Apr 22 '11 at 13:19

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
because you still did not switch to python 3 –  joaquin Apr 22 '11 at 9:58
4  
Please search. Questions of floating point are common. Perhaps every week someone asks this question. For example, all of these are the same question: stackoverflow.com/search?q=%5Bpython%5D+floating-point. –  S.Lott Apr 22 '11 at 10:00

3 Answers 3

That is due to the way the numbers are stored internally. The format is specified in the IEEE_754-2008 speficiation.

Some more information can be found on single precision floats here

share|improve this answer

From The Floating-Point Guide:

Why don’t my numbers, like 0.1 + 0.2 add up to a nice round 0.3, and instead I get a weird result like 0.30000000000000004?

Because internally, computers use a format (binary floating-point) that cannot accurately represent a number like 0.1, 0.2 or 0.3 at all.

When the code is compiled or interpreted, your “0.1” is already rounded to the nearest number in that format, which results in a small rounding error even before the calculation happens.

share|improve this answer

you can look at here for Floating Point Arithmetic Issues and Limitations

In any case in python 3 you have:

>>> 1
1
>>> 1.1
1.1
>>> 1.2
1.2
>>> 
share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.